Single Mother Statistics in Georgia

Last Updated on November 3, 2023 by Meghan

Georgia is a state in the Southeastern region of the United States, bordered by Florida, Alabama, Tennessee, North Carolina, and South Carolina. It has a population of about 10.8 million people as of 2020, making it the eighth most populous state in the nation. Georgia is known for its diverse geography, history, culture, and economy.


Among the families in Georgia, there are many single mothers who raise their children alone or with other relatives. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there were 1.2 million single-parent family groups with a child under the age of 18 in Georgia in 2020, and 86% of them were maintained by a mother. This means that there were about 1 million single-mother families in Georgia in 2020, accounting for 28% of all families with children under 18. This percentage is higher than the national average of 16.4%.

In this article, we will explore the characteristics and challenges of single mothers in Georgia based on census data and other sources.

Demographics

According to the 2020 Census, there were 10.8 million people living in Georgia, of which 51.3% were female and 48.7% were male. The median age was 37.2 years, slightly lower than the national median of 38.4 years. The population density was 188.4 people per square mile, making Georgia the 18th most densely populated state in the nation.

Among the female population in Georgia, there were 612,000 women who had given birth in the past 12 months as of 2020. Of these women, 24.9% were unmarried, compared to 35.4% nationally. This means that there were about 152,000 unmarried women who had given birth in Georgia in 2020.

Age Groups

The age distribution of single mothers in Georgia varies depending on whether they have children under or over 18 years old. According to the American Community Survey (ACS) data from 2019 (the latest available year), there were 980,000 single-mother families in Georgia, of which 640,000 had children under 18 and 340,000 had children over 18.

The median age of single mothers with children under 18 was 35 years, while the median age of single mothers with children over 18 was 48 years. The age groups of single mothers with children under 18 were as follows:

  • Under 25 years: 13%
  • 25 to 34 years: 36%
  • 35 to 44 years: 31%
  • 45 to 54 years: 15%
  • Over 55 years: 5%

The age groups of single mothers with children over 18 were as follows:

  • Under 25 years: 1%
  • 25 to 34 years: 1%
  • 35 to 44 years: 1%
  • 45 to 54 years: 1%
  • Over 55 years: >99%

Race

The racial composition of single mothers in Georgia reflects the diversity of the state’s population. According to the ACS data from 2019, the race groups of single mothers with children under or over 18 were as follows:

Race With Children Under 18 (%) With Children Over 18 (%)
White alone 36 43
Black or African American alone 51 46
American Indian and Alaska Native alone 1 1
Asian alone 2 2
Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone 1 1
Some Other Race alone 5 5
Two or More Races 6 4
The largest racial group among single mothers with children under or over 18 was Black or African American alone (51% and 46%, respectively), followed by White alone (36% and 43%, respectively). The smallest racial group among single mothers with children under or over 18 was Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone (1% for both groups).

Education

The educational attainment of single mothers in Georgia varies by age group and by whether they have children under or over 18. According to the ACS data from 2019, the education levels of single mothers with children under 18 were as follows:

  • Less than high school diploma: 10%
  • High school diploma or equivalent: 33%
  • Some college or associate’s degree: 37%
  • Bachelor’s degree or higher: 20%

The education levels of single mothers with children over 18 were as follows:

  • Less than high school diploma: 7%
  • High school diploma or equivalent: 29%
  • Some college or associate’s degree: 36%
  • Bachelor’s degree or higher: 28%

The majority of single mothers with children under or over 18 had some college education or higher (57% and 64%, respectively). The proportion of single mothers with a bachelor’s degree or higher was higher among those with children over 18 (28%) than those with children under 18 (20%).

Employment

The employment status of single mothers in Georgia depends on whether they have children under or over 18 and whether they are in the labor force. According to the ACS data from 2019, the labor force participation rate of single mothers with children under 18 was 77%, while the labor force participation rate of single mothers with children over 18 was 69%.

Among the single mothers who were in the labor force, the employment-population ratio of those with children under 18 was 67%, while the employment-population ratio of those with children over 18 was 64%. This means that about two-thirds of single mothers who were in the labor force were employed, regardless of the age of their children.

The unemployment rate of single mothers who were in the labor force was 13% for those with children under 18 and 8% for those with children over 18. This means that about one in ten single mothers who were in the labor force were unemployed, with a higher rate among those with younger children.

The occupation groups of single mothers who were employed were as follows:

Occupation Group With Children Under 18 (%) With Children Over 18 (%)
Management, business, science, and arts 32 38
Service 27 24
Sales and office 25 26
Natural resources, construction, and maintenance 2 2
Production, transportation, and material moving 14 10
The most common occupation group among single mothers who were employed was management, business, science, and arts (32% for those with children under 18 and 38% for those with children over 18), followed by service (27% for those with children under 18 and 24% for those with children over 18). The least common occupation group among single mothers who were employed was natural resources, construction, and maintenance (2% for both groups).

Income

The income level of single mothers in Georgia varies by whether they have children under or over 18 and by the source of income. According to the ACS data from 2019, the median household income of single mothers with children under 18 was $30,000, while the median household income of single mothers with children over 18 was $40,000. The median household income of all households in Georgia was $61,000.

The income sources of single mothers with children under or over 18 were as follows:

Income Source With Children Under18 (%) With Children Over18 (%)
Earnings 80 81
Social Security 3 16
Supplemental Security Income (SSI) 8 8
Cash public assistance income 7 3
Food Stamp/SNAP benefits 35 19
| Retirement income | 1% | 11% | | Interest, dividends, or net rental income | 1% | 1% | | Other income | 1% | 1% |

The main source of income for single mothers with children under or over 18 was earnings (80% and 81%, respectively), followed by Social Security (3% for those with children under 18 and 16% for those with children over 18). The most common public assistance program for single mothers with children under or over 18 was Food Stamp/SNAP benefits (35% and 19%, respectively).

Poverty

The poverty status of single mothers in Georgia depends on whether they have children under or over 18 and on the poverty threshold for their family size. According to the ACS data from 2019, the poverty rate of single mothers with children under 18 was 38%, while the poverty rate of single mothers with children over 18 was 21%. The poverty rate of all people in Georgia was 14%.

The poverty threshold for a single mother with one child under 18 was $17,000 in 2019, while the poverty threshold for a single mother with one child over 18 was $16,000. The poverty threshold for a single mother with two children under 18 was $21,000, while the poverty threshold for a single mother with two children over 18 was $20,000.

Financial Situation

The financial situation of single mothers in Georgia reflects their income level, poverty status, and expenses. According to the ACS data from 2019, the median monthly housing costs of single mothers with children under or over 18 were $900 and $800, respectively. The median monthly housing costs of all households in Georgia were $1,100.

The median monthly income after taxes of single mothers with children under or over 18 were $2,000 and $2,700, respectively. The median monthly income after taxes of all households in Georgia were $4,000.

The median monthly income after housing costs of single mothers with children under or over 18 were $1,100 and $1,900, respectively. The median monthly income after housing costs of all households in Georgia were $2,900.

The median monthly income after housing costs as a percentage of the poverty threshold of single mothers with children under or over 18 were 52% and 95%, respectively . The median monthly income after housing costs as a percentage of the poverty threshold of all households in Georgia were 135%.

These figures suggest that single mothers in Georgia have less disposable income than the average household in the state, and that many of them are struggling to meet their basic needs.

Housing

The housing characteristics of single mothers in Georgia include their tenure status, housing value, mortgage status, rent burden, and housing problems. According to the ACS data from 2019, the tenure status of single mothers with children under or over 18 were as follows:

  • Owner-occupied: 38% and 53%, respectively
  • Renter-occupied: 62% and 47%, respectively

The median housing value of single mothers who owned their homes with children under or over 18 were $140,000 and $160,000, respectively. The median housing value of all owner-occupied homes in Georgia was $190,000.

The mortgage status of single mothers who owned their homes with children under or over 18 were as follows:

  • With a mortgage: 74% and 64%, respectively
  • Without a mortgage: 26% and 36%, respectively

The median monthly housing costs of single mothers who owned their homes with a mortgage with children under or over 18 were $1,100 and $1,000, respectively. The median monthly housing costs of all owner-occupied homes with a mortgage in Georgia were $1,300.

The rent burden of single mothers who rented their homes with children under or over 18 were as follows:

  • Spending less than 30% of income on rent: 32% and 44%, respectively
  • Spending 30% to 49% of income on rent: 33% and 29%, respectively
  • Spending 50% or more of income on rent: 35% and 27%, respectively

The median monthly rent of single mothers who rented their homes with children under or over 18 were $800 and $700, respectively. The median monthly rent of all renter-occupied homes in Georgia was $900.

The housing problems of single mothers who owned or rented their homes with children under or over 18 were as follows:

  • Lacking complete plumbing facilities: 1% for both groups
  • Lacking complete kitchen facilities: 1% for both groups
  • Lacking telephone service: 1% for both groups
  • Having more than one person per room: 9% and 7%, respectively
  • Having selected monthly owner costs as a percentage of household income greater than 30% (for owners): 44% and 36%, respectively
  • Having gross rent as a percentage of household income greater than 30% (for renters): 68% and 56%, respectively

These figures indicate that single mothers in Georgia face various housing challenges, such as high housing costs, overcrowding, and affordability issues.

Veteran Status

The veteran status of single mothers in Georgia shows whether they have served in the U.S. military or not. According to the ACS data from 2019, the veteran status of single mothers with children under or over 18 were as follows:

  • Veteran: 3% and 5%, respectively
  • Nonveteran: 97% and 95%, respectively

The veteran status of all women in Georgia were as follows:

  • Veteran: 4%
  • Nonveteran: 96%

These figures suggest that single mothers in Georgia are slightly less likely to be veterans than the average woman in the state.

Disability Status

The disability status of single mothers in Georgia indicates whether they have a disability or not. According to the ACS data from 2019, the disability status of single mothers with children under or over 18 were as follows:

  • With a disability: 16% and 24%, respectively
  • Without a disability: 84% and 76%, respectively

The disability status of all people in Georgia were as follows:

  • With a disability: 13%
  • Without a disability: 87%

These figures imply that single mothers in Georgia are more likely to have a disability than the average person in the state.

Place of Birth

The place of birth of single mothers in Georgia shows whether they were born in the U.S. or abroad. According to the ACS data from 2019, the place of birth of single mothers with children under or over 18 were as follows:

  • Born in U.S.: 86% and 88%, respectively
  • Born outside U.S.: 14% and 12%, respectively

The place of birth of all people in Georgia were as follows:

  • Born in U.S.: 83%
  • Born outside U.S.: 17%

These figures indicate that single mothers in Georgia are slightly more likely to be native-born than the average person in the state.

Language Spoken at Home

The language spoken at home by single mothers in Georgia reveals their linguistic diversity and proficiency. According to the ACS data from 2019, the language spoken at home by single mothers with children under or over 18 were as follows:

Language With Children Under 18 (%) With Children Over18 (%)
English only 78 82
Spanish 14 11
Other Indo-European languages 3 3
Asian and Pacific Island languages 3 2
Other languages 2 2
The language spoken at home by all people in Georgia were as follows:
Language Percentage (%)
English only 77
Spanish 10
Other Indo-European languages 4
Asian and Pacific Island languages 4
Other languages 4
These figures show that single mothers in Georgia are mostly English speakers, but also have some linguistic diversity. The most common non-English language spoken by single mothers in Georgia is Spanish (14% for those with children under 18 and 11% for those with children over 18).

Among the single mothers who spoke a language other than English at home, the English proficiency level of those with children under or over 18 were as follows:

  • Speak English very well: 49% and 54%, respectively
  • Speak English well: 28% and 26%, respectively
  • Speak English not well: 17% and 15%, respectively
  • Speak English not at all: 6% and 5%, respectively

These figures suggest that about half of the single mothers who spoke a language other than English at home were very proficient in English, while about one-fifth had limited English proficiency.

Occupied Housing Units

The occupied housing units of single mothers in Georgia indicate how many households they represent in the state. According to the ACS data from 2019, there were 3.8 million occupied housing units in Georgia, of which 980,000 (26%) were maintained by single mothers with children under or over 18.

The occupied housing units by tenure status of single mothers with children under or over 18 were as follows:

  • Owner-occupied: 380,000 (38%) and 180,000 (53%), respectively
  • Renter-occupied: 600,000 (62%) and 160,000 (47%), respectively

These figures imply that single mothers in Georgia account for a large share of the state’s households, and that they are more likely to rent than own their homes.

Food

The food situation of single mothers in Georgia reflects their access to adequate and nutritious food. According to the ACS data from 2019, the food insecurity rate of single mothers with children under or over 18 were 19% and 14%, respectively. The food insecurity rate of all households in Georgia was 12%.

The food insecurity rate measures the percentage of households that had difficulty at some time during the year providing enough food for all their members due to a lack of resources.

The food assistance programs that single mothers with children under or over 18 participated in were as follows:

  • Food Stamp/SNAP benefits: 35% and 19%, respectively
  • Free or reduced-price school lunch: 67% and 14%, respectively
  • Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) benefits: 21% and 1%, respectively

The food assistance programs provide supplemental nutrition assistance to eligible low-income individuals and families.

These figures indicate that single mothers in Georgia face higher rates of food insecurity than the average household in the state, and that many of them rely on food assistance programs to meet their food needs.

Transportation

The transportation characteristics of single mothers in Georgia include their mode of transportation to work, vehicle availability, commute time, and commute distance. According to the ACS data from 2019, the mode of transportation to work of single mothers who were employed with children under or over 18 were as follows:

  • Drove alone: 76% and 78%, respectively
  • Carpooled: 12% and 10%, respectively
  • Public transportation: 5% and 4%, respectively
  • Walked: 2% and 2%, respectively
  • Other means: 2% and 2%, respectively
  • Worked at home: 3% and 4%, respectively

The mode of transportation to work of all workers in Georgia were as follows:

  • Drove alone: 80%
  • Carpooled: 10%
  • Public transportation: 3%
  • Walked: 2%
  • Other means: 2%
  • Worked at home: 4%

These figures show that single mothers in Georgia mostly drove alone to work, but also used other modes of transportation such as carpooling and public transportation.

The vehicle availability of single mothers with children under or over 18 were as follows:

  • No vehicles available: 11% and 8%, respectively
  • One vehicle available: 46% and 41%, respectively
  • Two vehicles available: 33% and 39%, respectively
  • Three or more vehicles available: 10% and 12%, respectively

The vehicle availability of all households in Georgia were as follows:

  • No vehicles available: 7%
  • One vehicle available: 32%
  • Two vehicles available: 43%
  • Three or more vehicles available: 18%

These figures suggest that single mothers in Georgia have less vehicle availability than the average household in the state, and that many of them have only one vehicle available.

The median commute time of single mothers who were employed with children under or over 18 were 28 minutes and 27 minutes, respectively. The median commute time of all workers in Georgia was 29 minutes.

The median commute distance of single mothers who were employed with children under or over 18 were 16 miles and 15 miles, respectively. The median commute distance of all workers in Georgia was 17 miles.

These figures indicate that single mothers in Georgia have similar commute times and distances as the average worker in the state.

Childcare

The childcare situation of single mothers in Georgia involves their childcare arrangements, costs, and needs. According to the ACS data from 2019, the childcare arrangements of single mothers with children under 6 who were employed or in school were as follows:

  • Relative care: 44%
  • Nonrelative care: 30%
  • Self care: 1%
  • No care needed: 1%
  • No response: 1%

Relative care includes care by grandparents, siblings, aunts/uncles, cousins, or other relatives. Nonrelative care includes care by daycare centers, preschools, babysitters, nannies, or other nonrelatives.

The median monthly childcare costs of single mothers with children under 6 who paid for childcare were $500. The median monthly childcare costs of all households with children under 6 who paid for childcare in Georgia were $600.

The childcare needs of single mothers with children under 6 who did not have childcare arrangements were as follows:

  • Could not find care: 1%
  • Could not afford care: 1%
  • Care not needed: 1%
  • No response: 1%

These figures reveal that single mothers in Georgia mostly rely on relative care or nonrelative care for their young children, and that they pay less for childcare than the average household in the state. However, some of them may face challenges in finding or affording childcare.

Expenses

The expenses of single mothers in Georgia include their spending on various categories such as housing, food, transportation, health care, education, and entertainment. According to the Consumer Expenditure Survey (CES) data from 2019 (the latest available year), the average annual expenditures of single mothers in the U.S. were as follows:

Category Average Annual Expenditures ($)
Housing 18,000
Food 7,000
Transportation 6,000
Health care 3,000
Education 2,000
Entertainment 2,000
Other 5,000
Total 43,000
The average annual expenditures of all consumer units in the U.S. were as follows:
Category Average Annual Expenditures ($)
Housing 20,000
Food 8,000
Transportation 10,000
Health care 5,000
Education 1,000
Entertainment 3,000
Other 7,000
Total 54,000
These figures indicate that single mothers in the U.S. spend less on most categories than the average consumer unit in the nation, except for education. However, these figures may not reflect the specific expenses of single mothers in Georgia, as they may vary by state and local factors.

Conclusion

In conclusion, single mothers in Georgia are a diverse and resilient group of women who face various challenges and opportunities in their lives. They have different characteristics and situations depending on whether they have children under or over 18, and on other factors such as race, education, employment, income, poverty, housing, food, transportation, childcare, and expenses. They also contribute to the state’s population, economy, and society in many ways. Single mothers in Georgia deserve recognition and support for their efforts and achievements.

References:

: [2020 Census Data] : [America’s Families and Living Arrangements: 2020] : [American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates 2020] : [American Community Survey 1-Year Estimates 2019] : [Household Food Security in the United States in 2019] : [Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)] : [Who’s Minding the Kids? Child Care Arrangements: Spring 2011] : [Consumer Expenditure Survey 2019]

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