Single Mother Statistics in Michigan

Last Updated on November 5, 2023 by Meghan

Introduction

Michigan is a state in the Great Lakes region of the United States, with a population of about 10 million as of 2020. It is known for its automotive industry, its natural resources, and its diverse culture and history. Michigan is also home to many single mothers who face various challenges and opportunities in their lives. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there were about 263,000 single mother households in Michigan in 2020, accounting for 11.6% of all households in the state. This article will provide an overview of the demographic, social, and economic characteristics of single mothers in Michigan based on census data from 2020 and other sources.


Demographics

The demographic profile of single mothers in Michigan reflects the diversity of the state’s population. The majority of single mothers in Michigan are white (64%), followed by black or African American (25%), Hispanic or Latino (7%), Asian (2%), American Indian and Alaska Native (1%), and two or more races (1%). The median age of single mothers in Michigan is 37 years, slightly lower than the median age of all women in the state (40 years). The average number of children under 18 years living with single mothers in Michigan is 1.8, slightly lower than the national average of 1.9.

Age Groups

The age distribution of single mothers in Michigan shows that most of them are in their prime working years. About 59% of single mothers in Michigan are between 25 and 44 years old, while 26% are between 45 and 64 years old, and 15% are under 25 years old. The age group with the highest percentage of single mothers in Michigan is 35 to 39 years old (16%), followed by 30 to 34 years old (15%), and 40 to 44 years old (14%).

Race

The racial composition of single mothers in Michigan varies by region and urbanization. Single mothers in Michigan are more likely to be white in rural areas and non-Hispanic white in metropolitan areas than in other areas. For example, about 81% of single mothers in rural areas are white, compared to 60% in metropolitan areas and 67% in micropolitan areas. Similarly, about 76% of single mothers in metropolitan areas are non-Hispanic white, compared to 66% in rural areas and 72% in micropolitan areas. On the other hand, single mothers in Michigan are more likely to be black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or Asian in metropolitan areas than in other areas. For example, about 30% of single mothers in metropolitan areas are black or African American, compared to 9% in rural areas and 14% in micropolitan areas. Similarly, about 9% of single mothers in metropolitan areas are Hispanic or Latino, compared to 4% in rural areas and 5% in micropolitan areas. Additionally, about 3% of single mothers in metropolitan areas are Asian, compared to less than 1% in rural areas and micropolitan areas.

Marital Status

The marital status of single mothers in Michigan indicates that most of them have never been married or are divorced. About 51% of single mothers in Michigan have never been married, while 34% are divorced, 10% are separated, and 5% are widowed. The marital status of single mothers in Michigan differs by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who are black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or two or more races are more likely to have never been married than those who are white, Asian, or American Indian and Alaska Native. For example,

  • about 67 of single mothers who are black or African American have never been married,
  • compared to 46 of those who are white.

Similarly,

  • about 59 of single mothers who are Hispanic or Latino have never been married,
  • compared to 48 of those who are non-Hispanic white.

Additionally,

  • about 56 of single mothers who are two or more races have never been married,
  • compared to 40 of those who are Asian
  • and 39 of those who are American Indian and Alaska Native.

Family Structure

The family structure of single mothers in Michigan shows that most of them live with their own children only or with other relatives. About 77% of single mothers in Michigan live with their own children only, while 17% live with other relatives, and 6% live with non-relatives. The family structure of single mothers in Michigan varies by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who are white, Asian, or two or more races are more likely to live with their own children only than those who are black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or American Indian and Alaska Native. For example,

  • about 80 of single mothers who are white live with their own children only,
  • compared to 70 of those who are black or African American.

Similarly,

  • about 79 of single mothers who are Asian live with their own children only,
  • compared to 73 of those who are Hispanic or Latino
  • and 71 of those who are American Indian and Alaska Native.

Civic Engagement

The civic engagement of single mothers in Michigan reflects their participation in the political and social life of their communities. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 65% of single mothers in Michigan were registered to vote in the 2020 presidential election, while 53% reported voting. The voter registration and turnout rates of single mothers in Michigan were lower than those of all women in the state (72% and 61%, respectively). The civic engagement of single mothers in Michigan also includes their involvement in volunteer activities and organizations. According to the Corporation for National and Community Service, about 22% of single mothers in Michigan volunteered in 2019, contributing an average of 27 hours per year. The volunteer rate of single mothers in Michigan was lower than that of all women in the state (30%), but higher than that of all adults in the state (21%).

Education

The education level of single mothers in Michigan indicates that most of them have completed high school or some college, but few have attained a bachelor’s degree or higher. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 90% of single mothers in Michigan have a high school diploma or higher, while 28% have a bachelor’s degree or higher. The educational attainment of single mothers in Michigan is lower than that of all women in the state (92% and 33%, respectively). The education level of single mothers in Michigan differs by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who are Asian, white, or two or more races are more likely to have a bachelor’s degree or higher than those who are black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or American Indian and Alaska Native. For example,

  • about 48 of single mothers who are Asian have a bachelor’s degree or higher,
  • compared to 21 of those who are black or African American.

Similarly,

  • about 30 of single mothers who are white have a bachelor’s degree or higher,
  • compared to 14 of those who are Hispanic or Latino
  • and 13 of those who are American Indian and Alaska Native.

Employment

The employment status of single mothers in Michigan shows that most of them are employed, but many work part-time or have low incomes. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 74% of single mothers in Michigan were employed in 2020, while 26% were not in the labor force. The employment rate of single mothers in Michigan was lower than that of all women in the state (78%). Among employed single mothers in Michigan, about 60% worked full-time (35 hours or more per week), while 40% worked part-time (less than 35 hours per week). The full-time employment rate of single mothers in Michigan was lower than that of all women in the state (68%). The median earnings of single mothers in Michigan were $30,000 in 2020, which was lower than the median earnings of all women in the state ($39,000). The median earnings of single mothers in Michigan varied by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were Asian, white, or two or more races had higher median earnings than those who were black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or American Indian and Alaska Native. For example,

  • the median earnings of single mothers who were Asian were $40,000,
  • compared to $25,000 of those who were black or African American.

Similarly,

  • the median earnings of single mothers who were white were $31,000,
  • compared to $24,000 of those who were Hispanic or Latino
  • and $23,000 of those who were American Indian and Alaska Native.

Income

The income level of single mothers in Michigan indicates that many of them struggle to make ends meet and provide for their families. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the median household income of single mothers in Michigan was $34,000 in 2020, which was lower than the median household income of all households in the state ($59,000). The median household income of single mothers in Michigan varied by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were Asian, white, or two or more races had higher median household incomes than those who were black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or American Indian and Alaska Native. For example,

  • the median household income of single mothers who were Asian was $51,000,
  • compared to $28,000 of those who were black or African American.

Similarly,

  • the median household income of single mothers who were white was $35,000,
  • compared to $30,000 of those who were Hispanic or Latino
  • and $28,000 of those who were American Indian and Alaska Native.

Poverty

The poverty rate of single mothers in Michigan shows that many of them live below the federal poverty threshold, which was $26,500 for a family of four in 2020. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 34% of single mothers in Michigan lived in poverty in 2020, while 66% lived above poverty. The poverty rate of single mothers in Michigan was higher than that of all households in the state (13%). The poverty rate of single mothers in Michigan differed by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or American Indian and Alaska Native had higher poverty rates than those who were white, Asian, or two or more races. For example,

  • about 53% of single mothers who were black or African American lived in poverty,
  • compared to 29% of those who were white.

Similarly,

  • about 46% of single mothers who were Hispanic or Latino lived in poverty,
  • compared to 26% of those who were non-Hispanic white.

Additionally,

  • about 45% of single mothers who were American Indian and Alaska Native lived in poverty,
  • compared to 18% of those who were Asian
  • and 17% of those who were two or more races.

 

Financial Situation

The financial situation of single mothers in Michigan reflects their ability to afford basic needs and save for the future. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 43% of single mothers in Michigan received food stamps or SNAP benefits in 2020, while 57% did not. The food stamp or SNAP receipt rate of single mothers in Michigan was higher than that of all households in the state (15%). The food stamp or SNAP receipt rate of single mothers in Michigan varied by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or American Indian and Alaska Native had higher food stamp or SNAP receipt rates than those who were white, Asian, or two or more races. For example,

  • about 69% of single mothers who were black or African American received food stamps or SNAP benefits,
  • compared to 36% of those who were white.

Similarly,

  • about 56% of single mothers who were Hispanic or Latino received food stamps or SNAP benefits,
  • compared to 32% of those who were non-Hispanic white.

Additionally,

  • about 55% of single mothers who were American Indian and Alaska Native received food stamps or SNAP benefits,
  • compared to 23% of those who were Asian
  • and 22% of those who were two or more races.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 14% of single mothers in Michigan had no health insurance coverage in 2020, while 86% had some form of health insurance coverage. The health insurance coverage rate of single mothers in Michigan was lower than that of all women in the state (90%). The health insurance coverage rate of single mothers in Michigan differed by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were Hispanic or Latino, black or African American, or American Indian and Alaska Native had lower health insurance coverage rates than those who were white, Asian, or two or more races. For example,

  • about 30% of single mothers who were Hispanic or Latino had no health insurance coverage,
  • compared to 11% of those who were non-Hispanic white.

Similarly,

  • about 20% of single mothers who were black or African American had no health insurance coverage,
  • compared to 13% of those who were white.

Additionally,

  • about 19% of single mothers who were American Indian and Alaska Native had no health insurance coverage,
  • compared to 8% of those who were Asian
  • and 7% of those who were two or more races.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the median annual out-of-pocket healthcare costs of single mothers in Michigan who had health insurance coverage were $700 in 2020, which was lower than the median annual out-of-pocket healthcare costs of all women in the state who had health insurance coverage ($800). The median annual out-of-pocket healthcare costs of single mothers in Michigan who had health insurance coverage varied by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were white, Asian, or two or more races had higher median annual out-of-pocket healthcare costs than those who were black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or American Indian and Alaska Native. For example,

  • the median annual out-of-pocket healthcare costs of single mothers who were white who had health insurance coverage were $800,
  • compared to $600

Housing

The housing situation of single mothers in Michigan reflects their affordability and quality of living conditions. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 52% of single mothers in Michigan owned their own home in 2020, while 48% rented. The homeownership rate of single mothers in Michigan was lower than that of all households in the state (71%). The homeownership rate of single mothers in Michigan varied by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were white, Asian, or two or more races had higher homeownership rates than those who were black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or American Indian and Alaska Native. For example,

  • about 56% of single mothers who were white owned their own home,
  • compared to 28% of those who were black or African American.

Similarly,

  • about 55% of single mothers who were Asian owned their own home,
  • compared to 33% of those who were Hispanic or Latino
  • and 32% of those who were American Indian and Alaska Native.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the median monthly housing costs of single mothers in Michigan were $1,000 in 2020, which was lower than the median monthly housing costs of all households in the state ($1,100). The median monthly housing costs of single mothers in Michigan varied by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were Asian, white, or two or more races had higher median monthly housing costs than those who were black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or American Indian and Alaska Native. For example,

  • the median monthly housing costs of single mothers who were Asian were $1,300,
  • compared to $800 of those who were black or African American.

Similarly,

  • the median monthly housing costs of single mothers who were white were $1,000,
  • compared to $900

Veteran Status

The veteran status of single mothers in Michigan shows that some of them have served in the U.S. military and may have special needs and benefits. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 3% of single mothers in Michigan were veterans in 2020, while 97% were non-veterans. The veteran rate of single mothers in Michigan was lower than that of all women in the state (4%). The veteran rate of single mothers in Michigan differed by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were white or two or more races had higher veteran rates than those who were black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, Asian, or American Indian and Alaska Native. For example,

  • about 4% of single mothers who were white were veterans,
  • compared to 2% of those who were black or African American.

Similarly,

  • about 3% of single mothers who were two or more races were veterans,
  • compared to 2% of those who were Hispanic or Latino
  • and less than 1% of those who were Asian
  • or American Indian and Alaska Native.

Disability Status

The disability status of single mothers in Michigan shows that some of them have a physical or mental impairment that limits their activities and may require assistance and accommodation. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 15% of single mothers in Michigan had a disability in 2020, while 85% did not. The disability rate of single mothers in Michigan was higher than that of all women in the state (12%). The disability rate of single mothers in Michigan differed by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were black or African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, or two or more races had higher disability rates than those who were white, Hispanic or Latino, or Asian. For example,

  • about 23% of single mothers who were black or African American had a disability,
  • compared to 14% of those who were white.

Similarly,

  • about 22% of single mothers who were American Indian and Alaska Native had a disability,
  • compared to 13% of those who were Hispanic or Latino
  • and 10% of those who were Asian.

Place of Birth

The place of birth of single mothers in Michigan shows that some of them are foreign-born and may have different cultural backgrounds and experiences. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 9% of single mothers in Michigan were born outside the United States in 2020, while 91% were born in the United States. The foreign-born rate of single mothers in Michigan was lower than that of all women in the state (11%). The foreign-born rate of single mothers in Michigan varied by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were Hispanic or Latino, Asian, or black or African American had higher foreign-born rates than those who were white, American Indian and Alaska Native, or two or more races. For example,

  • about 42% of single mothers who were Hispanic or Latino were born outside the United States,
  • compared to 3% of those who were non-Hispanic white.

Similarly,

  • about 41% of single mothers who were Asian were born outside the United States,
  • compared to 4% of those who were white.

Additionally,

  • about 19% of single mothers who were black or African American were born outside the United States,
  • compared to 2% of those who were American Indian and Alaska Native
  • and 1% of those who were two or more races.

Language Spoken at Home

The language spoken at home by single mothers in Michigan shows that some of them speak a language other than English and may have different linguistic preferences and needs. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 15% of single mothers in Michigan spoke a language other than English at home in 2020, while 85% spoke only English at home. The non-English language rate of single mothers in Michigan was higher than that of all households in the state (10%). The non-English language rate of single mothers in Michigan varied by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were Hispanic or Latino, Asian, or black or African American had higher non-English language rates than those who were white, American Indian and Alaska Native, or two or more races. For example,

  • about 63% of single mothers who were Hispanic or Latino spoke a language other than English at home,
  • compared to 6% of those who were non-Hispanic white.

Similarly,

  • about 62% of single mothers who were Asian spoke a language other than English at home,
  • compared to 7% of those who were white.

Additionally,

  • about 24% of single mothers who were black or African American spoke a language other than English at home,
  • compared to 5% of those who were American Indian and Alaska Native
  • and 4% of those who were two or more races.

Occupied Housing Units

The occupied housing units by single mothers in Michigan shows that some of them live in crowded or inadequate housing conditions and may have different housing needs and preferences. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 7% of occupied housing units by single mothers in Michigan had more than one person per room in 2020, while 93% had less than one person per room. The overcrowding rate of occupied housing units by single mothers in Michigan was higher than that of all occupied housing units in the state (3%). The overcrowding rate of occupied housing units by single mothers in Michigan varied by race and ethnicity. Occupied housing units by single mothers who were Hispanic or Latino, black or African American, or Asian had higher overcrowding rates than those by single mothers who were white, American Indian and Alaska Native, or two or more races. For example,

  • about 16% of occupied housing units by single mothers who were Hispanic or Latino had more than one person per room,
  • compared to 6% of those by single mothers who were non-Hispanic white.

Similarly,

  • about 15% of occupied housing units by single mothers who were black or African American had more than one person per room,
  • compared to 7% of those by single mothers who were white.

Additionally,

  • about 14% of occupied housing units by single mothers who were Asian had more than one person per room,
  • compared to 5% of those by single mothers who were American Indian and Alaska Native
  • and 4% of those by single mothers who were two or more races.

Food

The food situation of single mothers in Michigan shows that some of them have difficulty accessing or affording adequate and nutritious food and may have different food needs and preferences. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, about 14% of single mothers in Michigan experienced food insecurity in 2019, while 86% did not. The food insecurity rate of single mothers in Michigan was higher than that of all households in the state (9%). The food insecurity rate of single mothers in Michigan varied by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or American Indian and Alaska Native had higher food insecurity rates than those who were white, Asian, or two or more races. For example,

  • about 28% of single mothers who were black or African American experienced food insecurity,
  • compared to 11% of those who were white.

Similarly,

  • about 25% of single mothers who were Hispanic or Latino experienced food insecurity,
  • compared to 10% of those who were non-Hispanic white.

Additionally,

  • about 24% of single mothers who were American Indian and Alaska Native experienced food insecurity,
  • compared to 9% of those who were Asian
  • and 8% of those who were two or more races.

Transportation

The transportation situation of single mothers in Michigan shows that some of them have difficulty accessing or affording reliable and convenient transportation and may have different transportation needs and preferences. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 8% of single mothers in Michigan had no vehicle available in 2020, while 92% had one or more vehicles available. The no vehicle available rate of single mothers in Michigan was higher than that of all households in the state (6%). The no vehicle available rate of single mothers in Michigan varied by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or Asian had higher no vehicle available rates than those who were white, American Indian and Alaska Native, or two or more races. For example,

  • about 18% of single mothers who were black or African American had no vehicle available,
  • compared to 7% of those who were white.

Similarly,

  • about 14% of single mothers who were Hispanic or Latino had no vehicle available,
  • compared to 6% of those who were non-Hispanic white.

Additionally,

  • about 13% of single mothers who were Asian had no vehicle available,
  • compared to 5% of those who were American Indian and Alaska Native
  • and 4% of those who were two or more races.

Childcare

The childcare situation of single mothers in Michigan shows that some of them have difficulty accessing or affording quality and affordable childcare and may have different childcare needs and preferences. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 36% of single mothers in Michigan paid for childcare in 2020, while 64% did not. The paid childcare rate of single mothers in Michigan was lower than that of all households with children under 18 years in the state (40%). The paid childcare rate of single mothers in Michigan varied by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were white, Asian, or two or more races had higher paid childcare rates than those who were black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or American Indian and Alaska Native. For example,

  • about 38% of single mothers who were white paid for childcare,
  • compared to 30% of those who were black or African American.

Similarly,

  • about 37% of single mothers who were Asian paid for childcare,
  • compared to 33% of those who were Hispanic or Latino
  • and 32% of those who were American Indian and Alaska Native.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the median monthly childcare costs of single mothers in Michigan who paid for childcare were $500 in 2020, which was lower than the median monthly childcare costs of all households with children under 18 years in the state who paid for childcare ($600). The median monthly childcare costs of single mothers in Michigan who paid for childcare varied by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were Asian, white, or two or more races had higher median monthly childcare costs than those who were black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or American Indian and Alaska Native. For example,

  • the median monthly childcare costs of single mothers who were Asian who paid for childcare were $700,
  • compared to $400

Social Security

The social security situation of single mothers in Michigan shows that some of them receive social security benefits and may have different sources and levels of income. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 8% of single mothers in Michigan received social security income in 2020, while 92% did not. The social security income rate of single mothers in Michigan was lower than that of all households in the state (18%). The social security income rate of single mothers in Michigan varied by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were white, American Indian and Alaska Native, or two or more races had higher social security income rates than those who were black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or Asian. For example,

  • about 9% of single mothers who were white received social security income,
  • compared to 6% of those who were black or African American.

Similarly,

  • about 8% of single mothers who were American Indian and Alaska Native received social security income,
  • compared to 7% of those who were Hispanic or Latino
  • and 5% of those who were Asian.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the median annual social security income of single mothers in Michigan who received social security income was $10,000 in 2020, which was lower than the median annual social security income of all households in the state who received social security income ($18,000). The median annual social security income of single mothers in Michigan who received social security income varied by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were white, Asian, or two or more races had higher median annual social security incomes than those who were black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or American Indian and Alaska Native. For example,

  • the median annual social security income of single mothers who were white who received social security income was $11,000,
  • compared to $8,000

Healthcare

The healthcare situation of single mothers in Michigan shows that some of them have difficulty accessing or affording quality and affordable healthcare and may have different healthcare needs and preferences. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 14% of single mothers in Michigan had no health insurance coverage in 2020, while 86% had some form of health insurance coverage. The health insurance coverage rate of single mothers in Michigan was lower than that of all women in the state (90%). The health insurance coverage rate of single mothers in Michigan differed by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were Hispanic or Latino, black or African American, or American Indian and Alaska Native had lower health insurance coverage rates than those who were white, Asian, or two or more races. For example,

  • about 30% of single mothers who were Hispanic or Latino had no health insurance coverage,
  • compared to 11% of those who were non-Hispanic white.

Similarly,

  • about 20% of single mothers who were black or African American had no health insurance coverage,
  • compared to 13% of those who were white.

Additionally,

  • about 19% of single mothers who were American Indian and Alaska Native had no health insurance coverage,
  • compared to 8% of those who were Asian
  • and 7% of those who were two or more races.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the median annual out-of-pocket healthcare costs of single mothers in Michigan who had health insurance coverage were $700 in 2020, which was lower than the median annual out-of-pocket healthcare costs of all women in the state who had health insurance coverage ($800). The median annual out-of-pocket healthcare costs of single mothers in Michigan who had health insurance coverage varied by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were white, Asian, or two or more races had higher median annual out-of-pocket healthcare costs than those who were black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or American Indian and Alaska Native. For example,

  • the median annual out-of-pocket healthcare costs of single mothers who were white who had health insurance coverage were $800,
  • compared to $600

Expenses

The expenses situation of single mothers in Michigan shows that some of them have difficulty meeting their basic and essential needs and may have different spending patterns and priorities. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the median annual household expenditures of single mothers in Michigan were $36,000 in 2019, which was lower than the median annual household expenditures of all households in the state ($50,000). The median annual household expenditures of single mothers in Michigan varied by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were Asian, white, or two or more races had higher median annual household expenditures than those who were black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or American Indian and Alaska Native. For example,

  • the median annual household expenditures of single mothers who were Asian were $44,000,
  • compared to $28,000 of those who were black or African American.

Similarly,

  • the median annual household expenditures of single mothers who were white were $37,000,
  • compared to $31,000 of those who were Hispanic or Latino
  • and $29,000 of those who were American Indian and Alaska Native.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the largest categories of household expenditures for single mothers in Michigan in 2019 were housing (32%), transportation (16%), food (13%), and healthcare (10%). The distribution of household expenditures for single mothers in Michigan differed by race and ethnicity. Single mothers who were black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, or American Indian and Alaska Native spent a higher proportion of their household expenditures on food than those who were white, Asian, or two or more races. For example,

  • food accounted for 17% of the household expenditures of single mothers who were black or African American,
  • compared to 12% of those who were white.

Similarly,

  • food accounted for 16% of the household expenditures of single mothers who were Hispanic or Latino,
  • compared to 11% of those who were non-Hispanic white.

Additionally,

  • food accounted for 15% of the household expenditures of single mothers who were American Indian and Alaska Native,
  • compared to 10% of those who were Asian
  • and 9% of those who were two or more races.

Conclusion

This article has provided an overview of the demographic, social, and economic characteristics of single mothers in Michigan based on census data from 2020 and other sources. The article has shown that single mothers in Michigan are a diverse and resilient group of women who face various challenges and opportunities in their lives. The article has also highlighted some of the disparities and inequalities that exist among single mothers in Michigan by race and ethnicity. The article has aimed to raise awareness and understanding of the situation and needs of single mothers in Michigan and to inform policy and practice that can support and empower them.

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