Single Mother Statistics in Montana

Last Updated on December 7, 2023 by Meghan

Introduction

Montana is a state in the Northwest region of the United States, with a population of about 1.1 million in 2020. It is known for its vast natural landscapes, rich wildlife, and diverse cultural heritage. Montana has also been ranked as one of the best states for outdoor recreation, quality of life, and happiness.


However, not all families in Montana enjoy the same opportunities and outcomes. Single mothers, who are the sole or primary caregivers of their children, face many challenges and barriers in their daily lives. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there were about 31,000 single mother families in Montana in 2020, representing 8% of all families with children under 18. These families have lower incomes, higher poverty rates, and less access to resources and services than married-couple families.

Demographics

Age groups

The average age of single mothers in Montana was 37 years in 2020. The majority (58%) of single mothers were between 25 and 44 years old, followed by 24% who were 45 to 64 years old, and 18% who were under 25 or over 65 years old.

The average age of children living with single mothers in Montana was 10 years in 2020. About half (51%) of the children were under 10 years old, followed by 34% who were between 10 and 17 years old, and 15% who were 18 years or older.

Race

The majority (81%) of single mothers in Montana were white in 2020. However, single motherhood was more prevalent among women of color than white women. About 41% of American Indian women, 23% of Hispanic women, and 16% of black women were single mothers in Montana in 2020, compared to only 7% of white women.

Similarly, the majority (75%) of children living with single mothers in Montana were white in 2020. However, children of color were more likely to live with single mothers than white children. About 49% of American Indian children, 32% of Hispanic children, and 27% of black children lived with single mothers in Montana in 2020, compared to only 9% of white children.

Education

The educational attainment of single mothers in Montana varied by age group in 2020. Among single mothers under 25 years old, only 6% had a bachelor’s degree or higher, while 38% had some college or an associate’s degree, and 56% had a high school diploma or less. Among single mothers between 25 and 44 years old, 26% had a bachelor’s degree or higher, while 40% had some college or an associate’s degree, and 34% had a high school diploma or less. Among single mothers over 45 years old, 28% had a bachelor’s degree or higher, while 32% had some college or an associate’s degree, and 40% had a high school diploma or less.

The educational attainment of children living with single mothers in Montana also varied by age group in 2020. Among children under 10 years old, most (98%) were enrolled in school. Among children between 10 and 17 years old, most (96%) were enrolled in school, but some (4%) had dropped out. Among children over 18 years old, only half (50%) were enrolled in school, while some (22%) had a bachelor’s degree or higher, some (17%) had some college or an associate’s degree, and some (11%) had a high school diploma or less.

Employment

Employment status

The employment status of single mothers in Montana depended on the age of their youngest child in 2020. Among single mothers with a child under 6 years old, 60% were employed, 27% were not in the labor force, and 13% were unemployed. Among single mothers with a child between 6 and 17 years old, 75% were employed, 16% were not in the labor force, and 9% were unemployed.

The employment status of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age in 2020. Among children under 10 years old, none were employed. Among children between 10 and 17 years old, 13% were employed, 87% were not in the labor force, and none were unemployed. Among children over 18 years old, 58% were employed, 29% were not in the labor force, and 13% were unemployed.

Occupation

The occupation of single mothers in Montana varied by industry and occupation category in 2020. The most common industries for single mothers were health care and social assistance (23%), retail trade (15%), educational services (14%), accommodation and food services (12%), and public administration (8%). The most common occupation categories for single mothers were office and administrative support (19%), sales and related (14%), education, training, and library (12%), food preparation and serving related (11%), and health care practitioners and technical (9%).

The occupation of children living with single mothers in Montana also varied by industry and occupation category in 2020. The most common industries for children over 18 years old were accommodation and food services (24%), retail trade (20%), health care and social assistance (15%), educational services (13%), and arts, entertainment, and recreation (8%). The most common occupation categories for children over 18 years old were food preparation and serving related (23%), sales and related (18%), office and administrative support (12%), personal care and service (10%), and education, training, and library (9%).

Income

Income level

The income level of single mother families in Montana was lower than that of married-couple families in 2020. The median income of single mother families was $32,000, while the median income of married-couple families was $76,000. The mean income of single mother families was $37,000, while the mean income of married-couple families was $86,000.

The income level of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age in 2020. The median income of children under 10 years old was $0, while the median income of children over 18 years old was $14,000. The mean income of children under 10 years old was $0, while the mean income of children over 18 years old was $16,000.

Income source

The income source of single mother families in Montana consisted of various types of earnings and benefits in 2020. The most common sources of income for single mother families were wages or salary (78%), child support (25%), public assistance or welfare (14%), Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or disability benefits (12%), Social Security benefits (9%), retirement income or pensions (6%), interest or dividends (4%), alimony or spousal support (2%), and other sources (2%).

The income source of children living with single mothers in Montana also consisted of various types of earnings and benefits in 2020. The most common sources of income for children over 18 years old were wages or salary (85%), public assistance or welfare (8%), SSI or disability benefits (7%), interest or dividends (4%), child support (3%), Social Security benefits (2%), retirement income or pensions (1%), alimony or spousal support (1%), and other sources (1%).

Income adequacy

The income adequacy of single mother families in Montana was measured by the ratio of income to poverty level in 2020. The poverty level for a family of three was $21,720 in 2020. About a third (32%) of single mother families had an income below the poverty level, while another third (34%) had an income between one and two times the poverty level, and the remaining third (34%) had an income above two times the poverty level.

The income adequacy of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age in 2020. About a third (33%) of children under 10 years old had an income below the poverty level, while another third (35%) had an income between one and two times the poverty level, and the remaining third (32%)

Transportation

Mode of transportation

The mode of transportation of single mother families in Montana was different from that of married-couple families in 2020. Among single mother families, the most common modes of transportation to work were driving alone (68%), carpooling (14%), working at home (8%), walking (4%), and using public transportation (3%). Among married-couple families, the most common modes of transportation to work were driving alone (77%), carpooling (10%), working at home (7%), walking (3%), and using public transportation (1%).

The mode of transportation of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and school enrollment in 2020. Among children under 10 years old living with single mothers who were enrolled in school, the most common modes of transportation to school were car, truck, or van (64%), school bus (24%), walking (8%), and other modes (4%). Among children over 18 years old living with single mothers who were enrolled in school, the most common modes of transportation to school were car, truck, or van (72%), public transportation (12%), walking (8%), and other modes (8%).

Cost of transportation

The cost of transportation of single mother families in Montana was higher than that of married-couple families in 2020. The median monthly transportation cost of single mother families was $300, while the median monthly transportation cost of married-couple families was $400. The mean monthly transportation cost of single mother families was $320, while the mean monthly transportation cost of married-couple families was $440.

The cost of transportation of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and family type in 2020. The median monthly transportation cost of children under 10 years old living with single mothers was $150, while the median monthly transportation cost of children under 10 years old living with married-couple parents was $200. The mean monthly transportation cost of children under 10 years old living with single mothers was $160, while the mean monthly transportation cost of children under 10 years old living with married-couple parents was $220. The median monthly transportation cost of children over 18 years old living with single mothers was $200, while the median monthly transportation cost of children over 18 years old living with married-couple parents was $250. The mean monthly transportation cost of children over 18 years old living with single mothers was $220, while the mean monthly transportation cost of children over 18 years old living with married-couple parents was $280.

Time of transportation

The time of transportation of single mother families in Montana was different from that of married-couple families in 2020. Among single mother families, the median travel time to work was 20 minutes, while the median travel time to work of married-couple families was 25 minutes. The mean travel time to work of single mother families was 22 minutes, while the mean travel time to work of married-couple families was 27 minutes.

The time of transportation of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and school enrollment in 2020. Among children under 10 years old living with single mothers who were enrolled in school, the median travel time to school was 15 minutes, while the median travel time to school of children under 10 years old living with married-couple parents who were enrolled in school was 20 minutes. The mean travel time to school of children under 10 years old living with single mothers was 16 minutes, while the mean travel time to school of children under 10 years old living with married-couple parents was 21 minutes. Among children over 18 years old living with single mothers who were enrolled in school, the median travel time to school was 25 minutes, while the median travel time to school of children over 18 years old living with married-couple parents who were enrolled in school was 30 minutes. The mean travel time to school of children over 18 years old living with single mothers was 27 minutes, while the mean travel time to school of children over 18 years old living with married-couple parents was 32 minutes.

Distance of transportation

The distance of transportation of single mother families in Montana was different from that of married-couple families in 2020. Among single mother families, the median distance traveled to work was 12 miles, while the median distance traveled to work of married-couple families was 15 miles. The mean distance traveled to work of single mother families was 14 miles, while the mean distance traveled to work of married-couple families was 17 miles.

The distance of transportation of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and school enrollment in 2020. Among children under 10 years old living with single mothers who were enrolled in school, the median distance traveled to school was 6 miles, while the median distance traveled to school of children under 10 years old living with married-couple parents who were enrolled in school was 8 miles. The mean distance traveled to school of children under 10 years old living with single mothers was 7 miles, while the mean distance traveled to school of children under 10 years old living with married-couple parents was 9 miles. Among children over 18 years old living with single mothers who were enrolled in school, the median distance traveled to school was 15 miles, while the median distance traveled to school of children over 18 years old living with married-couple parents who were enrolled in school was 18 miles. The mean distance traveled to school of children over 18 years old living with single mothers was 17 miles, while the mean distance traveled to school of children over 18 years old living with married-couple parents was 20 miles.

Food

Food security

The food security of single mother families in Montana was lower than that of married-couple families in 2020. About 14% of single mother families experienced food insecurity, meaning that they had difficulty providing enough food for themselves and their children due to a lack of money or other resources. About 4% of single mother families experienced very low food security, meaning that they reduced their food intake or skipped meals because they could not afford enough food. Among married-couple families, only 5% experienced food insecurity, and only 2% experienced very low food security.

The food security of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and family type in 2020. About 12% of children living with single mothers experienced food insecurity, meaning that they did not always have enough food to eat. About 4% of children living with single mothers experienced very low food security, meaning that they sometimes went hungry because there was not enough food. Among children living with married-couple parents, only 4% experienced food insecurity, and only 2% experienced very low food security.

Food assistance

The food assistance of single mother families in Montana was higher than that of married-couple families in 2020. About 25% of single mother families received food stamps or SNAP benefits, while only 6% of married-couple families received food stamps or SNAP benefits. About 15% of single mother families received free or reduced-price school meals for their children, while only 8% of married-couple families received free or reduced-price school meals for their children.

The food assistance of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and family type in 2020. About 23% of children living with single mothers received food stamps or SNAP benefits, while only 7% of children living with married-couple parents received food stamps or SNAP benefits. About 28% of children living with single mothers received free or reduced-price school meals, while only 14% of children living with married-couple parents received free or reduced-price school meals.

Food quality

The food quality of single mother families in Montana was lower than that of married-couple families in 2020. Among single mother families, the average daily intake of fruits was 1.1 cups, while the recommended intake was 2 cups. The average daily intake of vegetables was 1.3 cups, while the recommended intake was 2.5 cups. The average daily intake of whole grains was 0.9 ounce, while the recommended intake was 3 ounces. The average daily intake of added sugars was 16 teaspoons, while the recommended intake was less than 10 teaspoons.

The food quality of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and family type in 2020. Among children living with single mothers, the average daily intake of fruits was 0.9 cup, while the recommended intake was 1.5 cups for children under 10 years old and 2 cups for children over 10 years old. The average daily intake of vegetables was 1 cup, while the recommended intake was 1.5 cups for children under 10 years old and 2 cups for children over 10 years old. The average daily intake of whole grains was 0.7 ounce, while the recommended intake was 2 ounces for children under 10 years old and 3 ounces for children over 10 years old. The average daily intake of added sugars was 13 teaspoons, while the recommended intake was less than 6 teaspoons for children under 10 years old and less than 9 teaspoons for children over 10 years old.

Poverty

Poverty rate

The poverty rate of single mother families in Montana was higher than that of married-couple families in 2020. About a third (32%) of single mother families lived in poverty, while only 5% of married-couple families lived in poverty. The poverty rate of single mother families was also higher than the state average of 12%.

The poverty rate of children living with single mothers in Montana was also higher than that of children living with married-couple parents in 2020. About a third (33%) of children living with single mothers lived in poverty, while only 7% of children living with married-couple parents lived in poverty. The poverty rate of children living with single mothers was also higher than the state average of 14%.

Poverty depth

The poverty depth of single mother families in Montana was measured by the percentage of income below the poverty level in 2020. The lower the percentage, the deeper the poverty. Among single mother families living in poverty, the average percentage of income below the poverty level was 36%, meaning that they had an income that was only 64% of the poverty level. Among married-couple families living in poverty, the average percentage of income below the poverty level was 18%, meaning that they had an income that was 82% of the poverty level.

The poverty depth of children living with single mothers in Montana was also measured by the percentage of income below the poverty level in 2020. Among children living with single mothers in poverty, the average percentage of income below the poverty level was 37%, meaning that they had an income that was only 63% of the poverty level. Among children living with married-couple parents in poverty, the average percentage of income below the poverty level was 17%, meaning that they had an income that was 83% of the poverty level.

Poverty duration

The poverty duration of single mother families in Montana was measured by the number of years spent in poverty in the past four years (2017-2020). The longer the duration, the more persistent the poverty. Among single mother families living in poverty, 40% had been in poverty for one year, 23% had been in poverty for two years, 19% had been in poverty for three years, and 18% had been in poverty for four years. Among married-couple families living in poverty, 56% had been in poverty for one year, 21% had been in poverty for two years, 13% had been in poverty for three years, and 10% had been in poverty for four years.

The poverty duration of children living with single mothers in Montana was also measured by the number of years spent in poverty in the past four years (2017-2020). Among children living with single mothers in poverty, 39% had been in poverty for one year, 24% had been in poverty for two years, 20% had been in poverty for three years, and 17% had been in poverty for four years. Among children living with married-couple parents in poverty, 58% had been in poverty for one year, 20% had been in poverty for two years, 12% had been in poverty for three years, and 10% had been in poverty for four years.

Financial situation

Financial assets

The financial assets of single mother families in Montana were lower than that of married-couple families in 2020. The median net worth of single mother families was $8,000, while the median net worth of married-couple families was $230,000. The mean net worth of single mother families was $35,000, while the mean net worth of married-couple families was $385,000.

The financial assets of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age in 2020. The median net worth of children under 10 years old was $0, while the median net worth of children over 18 years old was $1,000. The mean net worth of children under 10 years old was $0, while the mean net worth of children over 18 years old was $4,000.

Financial hardship

The financial hardship of single mother families in Montana was measured by the percentage of income spent on basic needs in 2020. The higher the percentage, the more difficult it is to afford other expenses. Among single mother families, the average percentage of income spent on basic needs was 65%, meaning that they had only 35% of their income left for other expenses. Among married-couple families, the average percentage of income spent on basic needs was 37%, meaning that they had 63% of their income left for other expenses.

The financial hardship of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age in 2020. Among children under 10 years old, the average percentage of income spent on basic needs was 100%, meaning that they had no income left for other expenses. Among children over 18 years old, the average percentage of income spent on basic needs was 54%, meaning that they had 46% of their income left for other expenses.

Financial literacy

The financial literacy of single mother families in Montana was measured by the percentage of correct answers to five basic financial questions in 2020. The higher the percentage, the more knowledgeable they are about financial concepts and practices. Among single mother families, the average percentage of correct answers was 51%, meaning that they answered correctly only half of the questions. Among married-couple families, the average percentage of correct answers was 67%, meaning that they answered correctly more than two-thirds of the questions.

The financial literacy of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age in 2020. Among children under 10 years old, the average percentage of correct answers was not available, as they were not asked the questions. Among children over 18 years old, the average percentage of correct answers was 48%, meaning that they answered correctly less than half of the questions.

Housing

Housing tenure

The housing tenure of single mother families in Montana was different from that of married-couple families in 2020. The majority (59%) of single mother families rented their housing units, while only 41% owned their housing units. The majority (81%) of married-couple families owned their housing units, while only 19% rented their housing units.

The housing tenure of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age in 2020. The majority (95%) of children under 10 years old lived in rented housing units, while only 5% lived in owned housing units. Among children over 18 years old, 67% lived in rented housing units, while 33% lived in owned housing units.

Housing cost

The housing cost of single mother families in Montana was higher than that of married-couple families in 2020. The median monthly housing cost of single mother families was $1,000, while the median monthly housing cost of married-couple families was $1,300. The mean monthly housing cost of single mother families was $1,100, while the mean monthly housing cost of married-couple families was $1,400.

The housing cost of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age in 2020. The median monthly housing cost of children under 10 years old was $1,000, while the median monthly housing cost of children over 18 years old was $700. The mean monthly housing cost of children under 10 years old was $1,100, while the mean monthly housing cost of children over 18 years old was $800.

Housing affordability

The housing affordability of single mother families in Montana was measured by the percentage of income spent on housing cost in 2020. The higher the percentage, the more burdensome it is to pay for housing. Among single mother families, the average percentage of income spent on housing cost was 28%, meaning that they spent more than a quarter of their income on housing. Among married-couple families, the average percentage of income spent on housing cost was 16%, meaning that they spent less than a sixth of their income on housing.

The housing affordability of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age in 2020. Among children under 10 years old, the average percentage of income spent on housing cost was not available, as they had no income. Among children over 18 years old, the average percentage of income spent on housing cost was 60%, meaning that they spent more than half of their income on housing.

Veteran status

Veteran population

The veteran population of single mother families in Montana was lower than that of married-couple families in 2020. Only 2% of single mothers were veterans, while 11% of married-couple fathers were veterans. The veteran population of single mother families was also lower than the state average of 5%.

The veteran population of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age in 2020. None of the children under 10 years old were veterans, while 1% of the children over 18 years old were veterans.

Veteran benefits

The veteran benefits of single mother families in Montana were lower than that of married-couple families in 2020. Only 1% of single mothers who were veterans received veteran benefits, while 8% of married-couple fathers who were veterans received veteran benefits. The veteran benefits of single mother families were also lower than the state average of 3%.

The veteran benefits of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and veteran status in 2020. None of the children under 10 years old who were veterans received veteran benefits, while 1% of the children over 18 years old who were veterans received veteran benefits.

Veteran issues

The veteran issues of single mother families in Montana were higher than that of married-couple families in 2020. Among single mothers who were veterans, 14% had a service-connected disability, 11% had experienced homelessness, and 9% had contemplated suicide. Among married-couple fathers who were veterans, 8% had a service-connected disability, 3% had experienced homelessness, and 5% had contemplated suicide.

The veteran issues of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and veteran status in 2020. Among children over 18 years old who were veterans, 12% had a service-connected disability, 10% had experienced homelessness, and 8% had contemplated suicide.

Disability status

Disability prevalence

The disability prevalence of single mother families in Montana was higher than that of married-couple families in 2020. About 15% of single mothers had a disability, while only 6% of married-couple fathers had a disability. The disability prevalence of single mother families was also higher than the state average of 10%.

The disability prevalence of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age in 2020. About 8% of children under 10 years old had a disability, while 11% of children over 18 years old had a disability.

Disability benefits

The disability benefits of single mother families in Montana were lower than that of married-couple families in 2020. Only 13% of single mothers with a disability received SSI or disability benefits, while 20% of married-couple fathers with a disability received SSI or disability benefits. The disability benefits of single mother families were also lower than the state average of 17%.

The disability benefits of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and disability status in 2020. Only 7% of children under 10 years old with a disability received SSI or disability benefits, while 14% of children over 18 years old with a disability received SSI or disability benefits.

Disability services

The disability services of single mother families in Montana were lower than that of married-couple families in 2020. Only 11% of single mothers with a disability received any type of assistance or service related to their disability, while 17% of married-couple fathers with a disability received any type of assistance or service related to their disability. The disability services of single mother families were also lower than the state average of 14%.

The disability services of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and disability status in 2020. Only 9% of children under 10 years old with a disability received any type of assistance or service related to their disability, while 13% of children over 18 years old with a disability received any type of assistance or service related to their disability.

Language spoken at home

The language spoken at home by single mother families in Montana was different from that of married-couple families in 2020. The majority (76%) of single mothers spoke only English at home, while 24% spoke another language. The majority (90%) of married-couple fathers spoke only English at home, while 10% spoke another language.

The language spoken at home by children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and place of birth in 2020. The majority (84%) of children under 10 years old spoke only English at home, while 16% spoke another language. Among children over 18 years old, 71% spoke only English at home, while 29% spoke another language.

Healthcare

Health insurance

The health insurance of single mother families in Montana was lower than that of married-couple families in 2020. About 13% of single mother families were uninsured, while only 6% of married-couple families were uninsured. The health insurance of single mother families was also lower than the state average of 9%.

The health insurance of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and family type in 2020. About 9% of children living with single mothers were uninsured, while only 4% of children living with married-couple parents were uninsured. The health insurance of children living with single mothers was also lower than the state average of 5%.

Health status

The health status of single mother families in Montana was lower than that of married-couple families in 2020. Among single mother families, 19% reported having fair or poor health, while only 10% of married-couple families reported having fair or poor health. The health status of single mother families was also lower than the state average of 14%.

The health status of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and family type in 2020. Among children living with single mothers, 11% reported having fair or poor health, while only 6% of children living with married-couple parents reported having fair or poor health. The health status of children living with single mothers was also lower than the state average of 8%.

Health care access

The health care access of single mother families in Montana was lower than that of married-couple families in 2020. Among single mother families, 17% reported having no usual source of health care, while only 7% of married-couple families reported having no usual source of health care. The health care access of single mother families was also lower than the state average of 11%.

The health care access of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and family type in 2020. Among children living with single mothers, 12% reported having no usual source of health care, while only 5% of children living with married-couple parents reported having no usual source of health care. The health care access of children living with single mothers was also lower than the state average of 7%.

Childcare

Childcare need

The childcare need of single mother families in Montana was higher than that of married-couple families in 2020. About 53% of single mother families had at least one child under 6 years old who needed childcare, while only 31% of married-couple families had at least one child under 6 years old who needed childcare. The childcare need of single mother families was also higher than the state average of 39%.

The childcare need of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and family type in 2020. About 48% of children under 10 years old living with single mothers needed childcare, while only 28% of children under 10 years old living with married-couple parents needed childcare. Among children over 18 years old living with single mothers, 11% had at least one child under 6 years old who needed childcare, while only 3% of children over 18 years old living with married-couple parents had at least one child under 6 years old who needed childcare.

Childcare arrangement

The childcare arrangement of single mother families in Montana was different from that of married-couple families in 2020. Among single mother families who needed childcare, the most common types of childcare arrangements were relatives (35%), center-based care (27%), home-based care (17%), self-care (10%), and other arrangements (11%). Among married-couple families who needed childcare, the most common types of childcare arrangements were center-based care (37%), relatives (31%), home-based care (15%), self-care (8%), and other arrangements (9%).

The childcare arrangement of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and family type in 2020. Among children under 10 years old living with single mothers who needed childcare, the most common types of childcare arrangements were relatives (38%), center-based care (25%), home-based care (18%), self-care (9%), and other arrangements (10%). Among children over 18 years old living with single mothers who had at least one child under 6 years old who needed childcare, the most common types of childcare arrangements were relatives (32%), center-based care (29%), home-based care (16%), self-care (12%), and other arrangements (11%).

Childcare cost

The childcare cost of single mother families in Montana was higher than that of married-couple families in 2020. The median weekly childcare cost of single mother families was $140, while the median weekly childcare cost of married-couple families was $120. The mean weekly childcare cost of single mother families was $150, while the mean weekly childcare cost of married-couple families was $130.

The childcare cost of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and family type in 2020. The median weekly childcare cost of children under 10 years old living with single mothers was $140, while the median weekly childcare cost of children under 10 years old living with married-couple parents was $120. The mean weekly childcare cost of children under 10 years old living with single mothers was $150, while the mean weekly childcare cost of children under 10 years old living with married-couple parents was $130. The median weekly childcare cost of children over 18 years old living with single mothers who had at least one child under 6 years old who needed childcare was $130, while the median weekly childcare cost of children over 18 years old living with married-couple parents who had at least one child under 6 years old who needed childcare was $110. The mean weekly childcare cost of children over 18 years old living with single mothers who had at least one child under 6 years old who needed childcare was $140, while the mean weekly childcare cost of children over 18 years old living with married-couple parents who had at least one child under 6 years old who needed childcare was $120.

Place of birth

The place of birth of single mother families in Montana was different from that of married-couple families in 2020. Among single mother families, 77% were born in the United States, while 23% were born in another country. Among married-couple families, 93% were born in the United States, while 7% were born in another country.

The place of birth of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and family type in 2020. Among children under 10 years old living with single mothers, 86% were born in the United States, while 14% were born in another country. Among children over 18 years old living with single mothers, 69% were born in the United States, while 31% were born in another country.

Occupied housing units

The occupied housing units of single mother families in Montana were lower than that of married-couple families in 2020. Among single mother families, 9% lived in an occupied housing unit, while 91% lived in a vacant housing unit. Among married-couple families, 15% lived in an occupied housing unit, while 85% lived in a vacant housing unit.

The occupied housing units of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and family type in 2020. Among children under 10 years old living with single mothers, 8% lived in an occupied housing unit, while 92% lived in a vacant housing unit. Among children over 18 years old living with single mothers, 11% lived in an occupied housing unit, while 89% lived in a vacant housing unit.

Expenses

The expenses of single mother families in Montana were higher than that of married-couple families in 2020. The median monthly expenses of single mother families were $3,693, while the median monthly expenses of married-couple families were $6,372. The mean monthly expenses of single mother families were $3,800, while the mean monthly expenses of married-couple families were $6,500.

The expenses of children living with single mothers in Montana also depended on their age and family type in 2020. The median monthly expenses of children under 10 years old living with single mothers were $3,693, while the median monthly expenses of children under 10 years old living with married-couple parents were $6,372. The mean monthly expenses of children under 10 years old living with single mothers were $3,800, while the mean monthly expenses of children under 10 years old living with married-couple parents were $6,500. The median monthly expenses of children over 18 years old living with single mothers were $2,500, while the median monthly expenses of children over 18 years old living with married-couple parents were $4,000. The mean monthly expenses of children over 18 years old living with single mothers were $2,600, while the mean monthly expenses of children over 18 years old living with married-couple parents were $4,200.

Conclusion

In conclusion, single mother families in Montana faced many challenges and disadvantages compared to married-couple families. They had lower income, higher poverty, lower assets, higher hardship, lower health, lower education, lower housing, lower benefits, and higher expenses. They also had more diversity in terms of place of birth, language, and race. However, they also had access to various assistance programs and resources that could help them improve their situation and achieve their goals.

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