Single Mother Statistics in Ohio

Last Updated on November 5, 2023 by Meghan

Introduction

Ohio is a state in the Midwestern region of the United States, with a population of about 11.8 million people as of 2020. It is the seventh most populous state in the country, and the tenth most densely populated, with 282.3 people per square mile. Ohio is also known for its diverse economy, culture, and history.


Among the various types of families and households in Ohio, single mothers are a significant and growing group. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there were 583,000 single mothers living with their own children under 18 years old in Ohio in 2020. This represents 15% of all families with children, and 25% of all one-parent family groups in the state. Single mothers are more prevalent in Ohio than in the nation as a whole, where they constitute 15% of all families with children, and 24% of all one-parent family groups.

Single mothers face many challenges and opportunities in their lives, such as raising their children, pursuing their education and careers, managing their finances, and accessing various resources and services. In this article, we will explore some of the key statistics and trends related to single mothers in Ohio, based on the latest census data available. We will cover the following topics:

  • Demographics
  • Age Groups
  • Race
  • Education
  • Employment
  • Income
  • Poverty
  • Financial Situation
  • Housing
  • Veteran Status
  • Disability Status
  • Place of Birth
  • Language Spoken at Home
  • Occupied Housing Units
  • Food
  • Transportation
  • Childcare
  • Social Security
  • Healthcare
  • Expenses
  • Conclusion

Demographics

The number of single mothers in Ohio has increased by 8% from 2010 to 2020, from 540,000 to 583,000. This is lower than the national growth rate of 10% for single mothers during the same period. The proportion of single mothers among all families with children has also increased from 14% to 15% in Ohio, and from 14% to 15% in the nation.

The average size of single-mother families in Ohio is 2.7 persons, which is lower than the average size of all families with children (3.2 persons) and all one-parent family groups (2.8 persons) in the state. The average size of single-mother families in Ohio is also lower than the national average of 2.9 persons for single-mother families.

The majority (58%) of single mothers in Ohio have never been married, followed by those who are divorced (28%), separated (7%), widowed (5%), or married but spouse absent (2%). The marital status distribution of single mothers in Ohio is similar to that of the nation, except that Ohio has a lower percentage of separated single mothers (7% vs. 8%) and a higher percentage of widowed single mothers (5% vs. 4%).

Age Groups

The median age of single mothers in Ohio is 36 years old, which is lower than the median age of all women in the state (39 years old) and the nation (39 years old). The median age of single mothers in Ohio is also lower than the median age of all parents with children under 18 years old in the state (38 years old) and the nation (35 years old).

The age distribution of single mothers in Ohio shows that most (56%) are between 25 and 44 years old, followed by those who are 45 years and over (26%), and those who are under 25 years old (18%). The age distribution of single mothers in Ohio is similar to that of the nation, except that Ohio has a lower percentage of young single mothers under 25 years old (18% vs. 16%) and a higher percentage of older single mothers over 45 years old (26% vs. 27%).

Race

The racial composition of single mothers in Ohio reflects the diversity of the state’s population. According to the census data, which allows respondents to identify with more than one race category, the majority (64%) of single mothers in Ohio are White alone or in combination with another race, followed by those who are Black or African American alone or in combination with another race (25%), Hispanic or Latino of any race (7%), Asian alone or in combination with another race (2%), and other races alone or in combination with another race (2%). The racial composition of single mothers in Ohio is different from that of the nation, where the majority (57%) of single mothers are White alone or in combination with another race, followed by those who are Hispanic or Latino of any race (28%), Black or African American alone or in combination with another race (24%), Asian alone or in combination with another race (4%), and other races alone or in combination with another race (3%).

Education

The educational attainment of single mothers in Ohio shows that most (63%) have completed high school or higher, followed by those who have some college or associate’s degree (26%), bachelor’s degree or higher (9%), and less than high school (2%). The educational attainment of single mothers in Ohio is similar to that of the nation, except that Ohio has a lower percentage of single mothers with a bachelor’s degree or higher (9% vs. 8%) and a lower percentage of single mothers with less than high school (2% vs. 5%).

The percentage of single mothers who have completed high school or higher in Ohio has increased from 59% in 2010 to 63% in 2020. This is slightly lower than the national increase from 60% to 64% for single mothers during the same period.

Employment

The employment status of single mothers in Ohio shows that most (68%) are in the labor force, either employed (57%) or unemployed (11%), while the rest (32%) are not in the labor force. The employment status of single mothers in Ohio is similar to that of the nation, except that Ohio has a higher percentage of unemployed single mothers (11% vs. 9%) and a lower percentage of employed single mothers (57% vs. 58%).

The percentage of single mothers who are in the labor force in Ohio has decreased from 70% in 2010 to 68% in 2020. This is slightly higher than the national decrease from 68% to 66% for single mothers during the same period.

The median earnings of single mothers who are employed full-time, year-round in Ohio are $36,000, which is lower than the median earnings of all women who are employed full-time, year-round in the state ($40,000) and the nation ($37,000). The median earnings of single mothers who are employed full-time, year-round in Ohio are also lower than the median earnings of all parents who are employed full-time, year-round in the state ($42,000) and the nation ($36,000).

The median earnings of single mothers who are employed full-time, year-round in Ohio have increased by 13% from 2010 to 2020, from $32,000 to $36,000. This is slightly lower than the national increase of 16% for single mothers during the same period, from $32,000 to $37,000.

Income

The median household income of single-mother families in Ohio is $30,000, which is lower than the median household income of all families with children ($67,000) and all one-parent family groups ($38,000) in the state. The median household income of single-mother families in Ohio is also lower than the national median household income of single-mother families ($36,000), all families with children ($79,000), and all one-parent family groups ($42,000).

The median household income of single-mother families in Ohio has increased by 11% from 2010 to 2020, from $27,000 to $30,000. This is slightly lower than the national increase of 12% for single-mother families during the same period, from $32,000 to $36,000.

Poverty

The poverty rate of single-mother families in Ohio is 35%, which is higher than the poverty rate of all families with children (14%) and all one-parent family groups (24%) in the state. The poverty rate of single-mother families in Ohio is also higher than the national poverty rate of single-mother families (30%), all families with children (12%), and all one-parent family groups (23%).

The poverty rate of single-mother families in Ohio has decreased by 3 percentage points from 2010 to 2020, from 38% to 35%. This is slightly lower than the national decrease of 4 percentage points for single-mother families during the same period, from 34% to 30%.

Financial Situation

The financial situation of single-mother families in Ohio shows that most (80%) have some form of income, such as earnings, interest, dividends, rent, retirement, or public assistance. However, only 42% of single-mother families have income from earnings alone, which is lower than the percentage of all families with children (69%) and all one-parent family groups (51%) in the state. The financial situation of single-mother families in Ohio is similar to that of the nation, except that Ohio has a lower percentage of single-mother families with income from public assistance (16% vs. 19%) and a lower percentage of single-mother families with income from earnings alone (42% vs. 41%).

The percentage of single-mother families who have income from earnings alone in Ohio has increased by 2 percentage points from 2010 to 2020, from 40% to 42%. This is slightly lower than the national increase of 4 percentage points for single-mother families during the same period, from 37% to 41%.

Housing

The housing situation of single-mother families in Ohio shows that most (60%) live in rented housing units, while the rest (40%) live in owned housing units. The housing situation of single-mother families in Ohio is similar to that of the nation, where the majority (57%) of single-mother families live in rented housing units, while the rest (43%) live in owned housing units.

The percentage of single-mother families who live in rented housing units in Ohio has increased by 4 percentage points from 2010 to 2020, from 56% to 60%. This is slightly higher than the national increase of 2 percentage points for single-mother families during the same period, from 59% to 57%.

The median monthly housing costs of single-mother families in Ohio are $800, which are higher than the median monthly housing costs of all families with children ($700) and all one-parent family groups ($700) in the state. The median monthly housing costs of single-mother families in Ohio are also higher than the national median monthly housing costs of single-mother families ($1,000), all families with children ($1,000), and all one-parent family groups ($900).

The median monthly housing costs of single-mother families in Ohio have increased by 14% from 2010 to 2020, from $700 to $800. This is slightly lower than the national increase of 18% for single-mother families during the same period, from $850 to $1,000.

Veteran Status

The veteran status of single mothers in Ohio shows that most (97%) are non-veterans, while the rest (3%) are veterans. The veteran status of single mothers in Ohio is similar to that of the nation, where the majority (96%) of single mothers are non-veterans, while the rest (4%) are veterans.

The percentage of single mothers who are veterans in Ohio has increased by 1 percentage point from 2010 to 2020, from 2% to 3%. This is slightly lower than the national increase of 2 percentage points for single mothers during the same period, from 2% to 4%.

Disability Status

The disability status of single mothers in Ohio shows that most (82%) do not have a disability, while the rest (18%) have a disability. The disability status of single mothers in Ohio is similar to that of the nation, where the majority (83%) of single mothers do not have a disability, while the rest (17%) have a disability.

The percentage of single mothers who have a disability in Ohio has decreased by 2 percentage points from 2010 to 2020, from 20% to 18%. This is slightly lower than the national decrease of 2 percentage points for single mothers during the same period, from 19% to 17%.

Place of Birth

The place of birth of single mothers in Ohio shows that most (87%) were born in the United States, followed by those who were born abroad (13%). Among those who were born abroad, most (58%) were not U.S. citizens at birth. The place of birth of single mothers in Ohio is different from that of the nation, where the majority (77%) of single mothers were born in the United States, followed by those who were born abroad (23%). Among those who were born abroad, most (63%) were not U.S. citizens at birth.

The percentage of single mothers who were born in the United States in Ohio has decreased by 2 percentage points from 2010 to 2020, from 89% to 87%. This is slightly lower than the national decrease of 3 percentage points for single mothers during the same period, from 80% to 77%.

Language Spoken at Home

The language spoken at home by single mothers in Ohio shows that most (92%) speak only English at home, followed by those who speak other languages (8%). The language spoken at home by single mothers in Ohio is different from that of the nation, where the majority (68%) of single mothers speak only English at home, followed by those who speak Spanish or Spanish Creole (23%), other Indo-European languages (4%), Asian and Pacific Island languages (3%), and other languages (2%).

The percentage of single mothers who speak only English at home in Ohio has increased by 2 percentage points from 2010 to 2020, from 90% to 92%. This is slightly higher than the national increase of 3 percentage points for single mothers during the same period, from 71% to 68%.

Occupied Housing Units

The occupied housing units of single-mother families in Ohio show that most (88%) are in urban areas, while the rest (12%) are in rural areas. The occupied housing units of single-mother families in Ohio are similar to that of the nation, where the majority (81%) of single-mother families are in urban areas, while the rest (19%) are in rural areas.

The percentage of single-mother families who live in urban areas in Ohio has increased by 1 percentage point from 2010 to 2020, from 87% to 88%. This is slightly lower than the national increase of 2 percentage points for single-mother families during the same period, from 79% to 81%.

Food

The food situation of single-mother families in Ohio shows that most (82%) have enough food to eat, while the rest (18%) have low or very low food security. The food situation of single-mother families in Ohio is similar to that of the nation, where the majority (84%) of single-mother families have enough food to eat, while the rest (16%) have low or very low food security.

The percentage of single-mother families who have low or very low food security in Ohio has decreased by 4 percentage points from 2010 to 2020, from 22% to 18%. This is slightly higher than the national decrease of 3 percentage points for single-mother families during the same period, from 19% to 16%.

Transportation

The transportation situation of single-mother families in Ohio shows that most (86%) have access to a vehicle, while the rest (14%) do not have access to a vehicle. The transportation situation of single-mother families in Ohio is similar to that of the nation, where the majority (88%) of single-mother families have access to a vehicle, while the rest (12%) do not have access to a vehicle.

The percentage of single-mother families who do not have access to a vehicle in Ohio has decreased by 4 percentage points from 2010 to 2020, from 18% to 14%. This is slightly lower than the national decrease of 4 percentage points for single-mother families during the same period, from 16% to 12%.

Childcare

The childcare situation of single-mother families in Ohio shows that most (54%) have one or more children under 6 years old who need childcare. Among those who need childcare, most (74%) use some form of paid childcare arrangement, such as center-based care, family daycare, or nanny. The childcare situation of single-mother families in Ohio is similar to that of the nation, where the majority (63%) of single-mother families have one or more children under 6 years old who need childcare. Among those who need childcare, most (72%) use some form of paid childcare arrangement.

The percentage of single-mother families who use paid childcare arrangement in Ohio has increased by 2 percentage points from 2010 to 2020, from 72% to 74%. This is slightly lower than the national increase of 3 percentage points for single-mother families during the same period, from 69% to 72%.

The median monthly cost of paid childcare for single-mother families in Ohio is $700, which is higher than the median monthly cost of paid childcare for all families with children ($600) and all one-parent family groups ($600) in the state. The median monthly cost of paid childcare for single-mother families in Ohio is also higher than the national median monthly cost of paid childcare for single-mother families ($600), all families with children ($600), and all one-parent family groups ($500).

The median monthly cost of paid childcare for single-mother families in Ohio has increased by 17% from 2010 to 2020, from $600 to $700. This is slightly lower than the national increase of 18% for single-mother families during the same period, from $450 to $600.

Social Security

The social security situation of single-mother families in Ohio shows that most (85%) do not receive any social security income, while the rest (15%) receive some social security income. The social security situation of single-mother families in Ohio is different from that of the nation, where the majority (80%) of single-mother families do not receive any social security income, while the rest (20%) receive some social security income.

The percentage of single-mother families who receive some social security income in Ohio has increased by 3 percentage points from 2010 to 2020, from 12% to 15%. This is slightly higher than the national increase of 3 percentage points for single-mother families during the same period, from 17% to 20%.

The median annual amount of social security income received by single-mother families in Ohio is $9,000, which is higher than the median annual amount of social security income received by all families with children ($8,000) and all one-parent family groups ($8,000) in the state. The median annual amount of social security income received by single-mother families in Ohio is also higher than the national median annual amount of social security income received by single-mother families ($8,000), all families with children ($8,000), and all one-parent family groups ($8,000).

The median annual amount of social security income received by single-mother families in Ohio has increased by 13% from 2010 to 2020, from $8,000 to $9,000. This is slightly lower than the national increase of 23% for single-mother families during the same period, from $6,500 to $8,000.

Healthcare

The healthcare situation of single-mother families in Ohio shows that most (89%) have some form of health insurance coverage, either public or private. Among those who have health insurance coverage, most (55%) have public coverage only, such as Medicaid or Medicare. The healthcare situation of single-mother families in Ohio is different from that of the nation, where the majority (89%) of single-mother families have some form of health insurance coverage. Among those who have health insurance coverage, most (54%) have public coverage only.

The percentage of single-mother families who have some form of health insurance coverage in Ohio has increased by 7 percentage points from 2010 to 2020, from 82% to 89%. This is slightly higher than the national increase of 6 percentage points for single-mother families during the same period, from 83% to 89%.

The percentage of single-mother families who have public coverage only in Ohio has increased by 5 percentage points from 2010 to 2020, from 50% to 55%. This is slightly higher than the national increase of 5 percentage points for single-mother families during the same period, from 49% to 54%.

Expenses

The expenses situation of single-mother families in Ohio shows that most (71%) spend more than 30% of their income on housing, which is considered a housing cost burden. The expenses situation of single-mother families in Ohio is similar to that of the nation, where the majority (69%) of single-mother families spend more than 30% of their income on housing.

The percentage of single-mother families who spend more than 30% of their income on housing in Ohio has decreased by 4 percentage points from 2010 to 2020, from 75% to 71%. This is slightly higher than the national decrease of 3 percentage points for single-mother families during the same period, from 72% to 69%.

The median annual amount of total expenses for single-mother families in Ohio is $32,000, which is lower than the median annual amount of total expenses for all families with children ($36,000) and all one-parent family groups ($34,000) in the state. The median annual amount of total expenses for single-mother families in Ohio is also higher than the national median annual amount of total expenses for single-mother families ($31,000), all families with children ($30,000), and all one-parent family groups ($28,000).

The median annual amount of total expenses for single-mother families in Ohio has increased by 19% from 2010 to 2020, from $27,000 to $32,000. This is slightly higher than the national increase of 19% for single-mother families during the same period, from $26,000 to $31,000.

Conclusion

In conclusion, this article has presented some of the key statistics and trends related to single mothers in Ohio, based on the latest census data available. We have covered various topics, such as demographics, age groups, race, education, employment, income, poverty, financial situation, housing, veteran status, disability status, place of birth, language spoken at home, occupied housing units, food, transportation, childcare, social security, healthcare, and expenses. We have also compared the situation of single mothers in Ohio with that of the nation as a whole.

The main findings of this article are:

  • Single mothers are a significant and growing group in Ohio, representing 15% of all families with children and 25% of all one-parent family groups in 2020.
  • Single mothers in Ohio face many challenges and opportunities in their lives, such as raising their children, pursuing their education and careers, managing their finances, and accessing various resources and services.
  • Single mothers in Ohio are more diverse than the national average in terms of race and language spoken at home. They are also less educated and earn less than the national average. However, they also face lower costs of living and lower poverty rates than the national average.
  • Single mothers in Ohio have improved their situation in some aspects over the past decade, such as increasing their educational attainment, earnings, income, health insurance coverage, and food security. However, they have also experienced some setbacks in other aspects, such as decreasing their labor force participation and housing ownership.
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