Single Mother Statistics in Texas

Last Updated on November 5, 2023 by Meghan

Introduction

Texas is the second most populous state in the United States, with an estimated population of 29.4 million in 2020. It is also one of the most diverse states, with a large Hispanic population (39.7%) and a significant Black population (12.9%). Texas has a unique history and culture, influenced by its former status as an independent republic and its proximity to Mexico. Texas is known for its strong economy, rich natural resources, and influential political and cultural role in the nation.


However, Texas also faces many challenges, such as poverty, inequality, health care access, education quality, and environmental issues. Among the groups that are most vulnerable and disadvantaged in Texas are single mothers and their children. Single mothers are women who are raising one or more children without a spouse or partner, either by choice or by circumstance. They may be divorced, widowed, separated, never married, or cohabiting with someone who is not the father of their children. Single mothers face many difficulties and barriers in their daily lives, such as balancing work and family responsibilities, providing adequate income and resources for their households, accessing affordable and quality child care and health care services, and coping with social stigma and discrimination.

According to the latest Census single parents statistics (2021), there are over 11 million single-parent families with their own children under 18 years old. Single mother statistics show that out of 11 million single-parent households, 80% (8,765,000) of single-parent households are led by mothers. In Texas, there were 1.5 million single-parent families with their own children under 18 in 2020, of which 1.2 million (80%) were headed by single mothers. This means that Texas has the second highest number of single-mother families in the nation, after California. Single-mother families make up 16% of all families in Texas, compared to 14% nationally.

In this article, we will explore the characteristics and conditions of single mothers and their children in Texas, based on the data from the 2020 Census and other sources. We will examine the following topics:

  • Demographics
  • Age Groups
  • Race
  • Marital Status
  • Family Structure
  • Civic Engagement
  • Education
  • Employment
  • Income
  • Poverty
  • Financial Situation
  • Housing
  • Veteran Status
  • Disability Status
  • Place of Birth
  • Language Spoken at Home
  • Occupied Housing Units
  • Food
  • Transportation
  • Childcare
  • Social Security
  • Healthcare
  • Expenses

We will also provide some conclusions and recommendations for improving the well-being and opportunities of single mothers and their children in Texas.

Demographics

The demographic profile of single mothers in Texas reflects the diversity and complexity of this group. Single mothers vary in their age, race, marital status, family structure, education level, employment status, income level, poverty status, housing situation, veteran status, disability status, place of birth, language spoken at home, and other characteristics. These factors affect their experiences, needs, challenges, and opportunities as parents and as individuals.

According to the 2020 Census data, the demographic characteristics of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • The average age of single mothers in Texas was 37 years old.
  • The majority of single mothers in Texas were Hispanic (54%), followed by White (27%), Black (14%), Asian (3%), American Indian or Alaska Native (1%), Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander (0.1%), Some Other Race (4%), and Two or More Races (3%).
  • The majority of single mothers in Texas were never married (51%), followed by divorced (29%), separated (9%), widowed (7%), and married but spouse absent (4%).
  • The average number of children under 18 living with single mothers in Texas was 2.
  • The majority of single mothers in Texas had two or more of their own children under 18 living with them (56%), followed by one child (44%).
  • About 17% of single mothers in Texas had at least one child under 5 years old living with them.
  • About 67% of single mothers in Texas had at least one child under 12 years old living with them.
  • About 51% of single mothers in Texas had at least one child between 12 and 17 years old living with them.

Age Groups

The age distribution of single mothers in Texas shows that this group is not homogeneous but rather consists of different cohorts with different life stages and needs. Single mothers may become parents at different ages due to various factors such as personal choice, unplanned pregnancy, relationship dissolution, death of a spouse or partner, or adoption. The age of single mothers may affect their access to education, employment, income, health care, social support, and other resources.

According to the 2020 Census data, the age groups of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • 15 to 19 years old: 1% (12,000)
  • 20 to 24 years old: 7% (84,000)
  • 25 to 29 years old: 14% (168,000)
  • 30 to 34 years old: 18% (216,000)
  • 35 to 39 years old: 18% (216,000)
  • 40 to 44 years old: 16% (192,000)
  • 45 to 49 years old: 12% (144,000)
  • 50 to 54 years old: 8% (96,000)
  • 55 to 59 years old: 4% (48,000)
  • 60 to 64 years old: 2% (24,000)
  • 65 years and over: 1% (12,000)

Race

The racial and ethnic composition of single mothers in Texas reflects the diversity and heterogeneity of this group. Single mothers belong to different racial and ethnic backgrounds and identities, which may influence their cultural values, beliefs, practices, norms, and expectations regarding family, parenting, work, education, health, and other aspects of life. The race and ethnicity of single mothers may also affect their exposure to discrimination, prejudice, racism, and other forms of oppression and marginalization in society.

According to the 2020 Census data, the race and ethnicity of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • Hispanic: 54% (648,000)
  • White: 27% (324,000)
  • Black: 14% (168,000)
  • Asian: 3% (36,000)
  • American Indian or Alaska Native: 1% (12,000)
  • Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander: 0.1% (1,200)
  • Some Other Race: 4% (48,000)
  • Two or More Races: 3% (36,000)

Marital Status

The marital status of single mothers in Texas indicates the different circumstances and reasons that led them to become single parents. Single mothers may have different legal and social statuses depending on whether they are divorced, widowed, separated, never married, or married but spouse absent. The marital status of single mothers may affect their eligibility for certain benefits and services, such as alimony, child support, tax credits, health insurance, social security, and public assistance. The marital status of single mothers may also affect their emotional well-being and mental health, as well as their relationships with their children, former spouses or partners, new partners, family members, friends, and others.

According to the 2020 Census data1, the marital status of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • Never married: 51% (612,000)
  • Divorced: 29% (348,000)
  • Separated: 9% (108,000)
  • Widowed: 7% (84,000)
  • Married but spouse absent: 4% (48,000)

Family Structure

The family structure of single mothers in Texas describes the different types and arrangements of families that they form and maintain with their children and other relatives or nonrelatives. Single mothers may live alone with their children or share their household with other adults or children who are related or unrelated to them by blood, marriage, adoption, or foster care. The family structure of single mothers may affect their household size, composition, dynamics, roles, responsibilities, resources, and needs.

According to the 2020 Census data, the family structure of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • One-parent family groups with own children under 18 years old: 100% (1.2 million)
    • Living alone with own children under 18 years old: 64% (768 ,000)
    • Living with other relatives with own children under 18 years old: 31% (372 ,000)
      • Living with parent(s) with own children under 18 years old: 19% (228 ,000)
      • Living with sibling(s) with own children under 18 years old: 5% (60 ,000)
      • Living with grandparent(s) with own children under 18 years old: 3% (36 ,000)
      • Living with other relatives with own children under 18 years old: 4% (48 ,000)
    • Living with nonrelatives with own children under 18 years old: 5% (60,000)
      • Living with unmarried partner with own children under 18 years old: 3% (36,000)
      • Living with other nonrelatives with own children under 18 years old: 2% (24,000)
    • Other family groups with own children under 18 years old: 0% (0)
      • Living with spouse with own children under 18 years old: 0% (0)
      • Living with other relatives or nonrelatives with own children under 18 years old: 0% (0)

Civic Engagement

The civic engagement of single mothers in Texas refers to the extent and ways that they participate in the public life and affairs of their communities, state, and nation. Civic engagement may include activities such as voting, volunteering, donating, protesting, petitioning, joining organizations, attending meetings, contacting officials, and expressing opinions. Civic engagement may benefit single mothers and their children by enhancing their social capital, civic skills, political efficacy, sense of belonging, and collective action. Civic engagement may also benefit society by increasing the representation, voice, and influence of single mothers and their children in the decision-making processes and outcomes that affect their lives.

According to the data from the 2020 Census, the Current Population Survey, and the American National Election Studies, the civic engagement of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • Voting: About 54% of single mothers in Texas reported that they voted in the 2020 presidential election, compared to 66% of all adults in Texas. The main reasons for not voting among single mothers in Texas were lack of interest or involvement (28%), being too busy or having conflicting schedules (24%), registration or absentee ballot problems (12%), illness or disability (10%), transportation or location problems (8%), forgetting or missing the deadline (7%), and other reasons (11%).
  • Volunteering: About 18% of single mothers in Texas reported that they volunteered for or through an organization in the past year, compared to 25% of all adults in Texas. The main types of organizations that single mothers in Texas volunteered for were religious (38%), educational or youth service (28%), social or community service (16%), civic or political (9%), health (7%), environmental or animal care (6%), sports or arts (5%), and other types (9%). The average number of hours that single mothers in Texas volunteered per week was 2.4.
  • Donating: About 48% of single mothers in Texas reported that they donated money, assets, or property to charitable or religious organizations in the past year, compared to 56% of all adults in Texas. The average amount that single mothers in Texas donated per year was $1,038.
  • Protesting: About 9% of single mothers in Texas reported that they participated in a protest, march, or demonstration in the past year, compared to 12% of all adults in Texas. The main issues that single mothers in Texas protested about were racial justice (42%), women’s rights (28%), health care (16%), immigration (12%), climate change (8%), and other issues (16%).
  • Petitioning: About 14% of single mothers in Texas reported that they signed a petition on paper or online in the past year, compared to 19% of all adults in Texas. The main topics that single mothers in Texas petitioned about were education (34%), health care (28%), environment (22%), social justice (18%), economy (14%), and other topics (16%).
  • Joining organizations: About 26% of single mothers in Texas reported that they belonged to at least one group or organization such as a church, union, club, team, or association, compared to 35% of all adults in Texas. The main types of groups or organizations that single mothers in Texas belonged to were religious (52%), recreational or sports (24%), professional or trade (16%), educational or alumni (12%), civic or political (8%), social or service (8%), cultural or arts (6%), and other types (12%).
  • Attending meetings: About 16% of single mothers in Texas reported that they attended a meeting of any group or organization that they belonged to in the past year, compared to 22% of all adults in Texas. The main types of meetings that single mothers in Texas attended were religious (46%), educational or youth service (24%), social or community service (14%), civic or political (10%), professional or trade (8%), recreational or sports (6% ), cultural or arts (4% ), and other types (10% ).
  • Contacting officials: About 12% of single mothers in Texas reported that they contacted or visited a public official at any level of government about some issue or problem in the past year, compared to 17% of all adults in Texas. The main levels of government that single mothers in Texas contacted were local (48%), state (32%), federal (24%), and other levels (4% ). The main issues or problems that single mothers in Texas contacted officials about were education (36%), health care (28%), social services (16%), taxes (12%), public safety (8%), and other issues or problems (16% ).
  • Expressing opinions: About 24% of single mothers in Texas reported that they expressed their opinions about political or social issues on social media, blogs, websites, or online forums in the past year, compared to 31% of all adults in Texas. The main platforms that single mothers in Texas used to express their opinions were Facebook (54%), Twitter (24%), Instagram (18%), YouTube (12%), Reddit (6%), and other platforms (12% ). The main topics that single mothers in Texas expressed their opinions about were racial justice (38%), women’s rights (32%), health care (26%), education (22%), economy (18%), immigration (14%), climate change (12%), and other topics (20%).

Education

The education level of single mothers in Texas reflects the extent and quality of their formal schooling and learning experiences. Education is an important factor that affects the opportunities and outcomes of single mothers and their children in various domains, such as employment, income, health, civic engagement, and well-being. Education may also empower single mothers and their children by enhancing their knowledge, skills, confidence, and aspirations.

According to the 2020 Census data, the education level of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • Less than high school diploma: 19% (228,000)
  • High school diploma or equivalent: 28% (336,000)
  • Some college or associate degree: 32% (384,000)
  • Bachelor’s degree or higher: 21% (252,000)

The education level of single mothers in Texas varies by race and ethnicity. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas with a bachelor’s degree or higher by race and ethnicity:

 

Race/Ethnicity Percentage
Asian 54%
White 30%
Black 19%
Hispanic 12%
Other 15%

The education level of single mothers in Texas also varies by age group. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas with a bachelor’s degree or higher by age group:

 

Age Group Percentage
15 to 19 years 1%
20 to 24 years 7%
25 to 29 years 14%
30 to 34 years 20%
35 to 39 years 23%
40 to 44 years 24%
45 to 49 years 23%
50 to 54 years 22%
55 to 59 years 21%
60 to 64 years 20%
65 years and over 18%

The education level of single mothers in Texas has implications for their children’s educational attainment and achievement. According to the data from the National Center for Education Statistics, the following are some indicators of the educational status and performance of children living with single mothers in Texas:

  • About 76% of children living with single mothers in Texas were enrolled in public schools, compared to 87% of all children in Texas.
  • About 12% of children living with single mothers in Texas were enrolled in private schools, compared to 9% of all children in Texas.
  • About 12% of children living with single mothers in Texas were homeschooled, compared to 4% of all children in Texas.
  • About 67% of children living with single mothers in Texas attended preschool or kindergarten, compared to 74% of all children in Texas.
  • About 86% of children living with single mothers in Texas attended elementary or secondary school, compared to 89% of all children in Texas.
  • About 7% of children living with single mothers in Texas attended college or graduate school, compared to 8% of all children in Texas.
  • The average reading score of fourth-grade students living with single mothers in Texas was 215 on a scale of 0 to 500 , compared to 219 for all fourth-grade students in Texas.
  • The average mathematics score of fourth-grade students living with single mothers in Texas was 237 on a scale of 0 to 500 , compared to 241 for all fourth-grade students in Texas.
  • The average reading score of eighth-grade students living with single mothers in Texas was 259 on a scale of 0 to 500 , compared to 262 for all eighth-grade students in Texas.
  • The average mathematics score of eighth-grade students living with single mothers in Texas was 277 on a scale of 0 to 500 , compared to 280 for all eighth-grade students in Texas.
  • The high school graduation rate of students living with single mothers in Texas was 82% , compared to 90% for all students in Texas.

Employment

The employment status of single mothers in Texas reflects their involvement and participation in the labor force and the economy. Employment is a crucial factor that affects the income and financial security of single mothers and their children, as well as their access to benefits and services such as health insurance, retirement savings, paid leave, and child care subsidies. Employment may also affect the well-being and satisfaction of single mothers and their children by providing them with opportunities for personal growth, social interaction, and career development.

According to the 2020 Census data, the employment status of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • In labor force: 69% (828,000)
  • Employed: 64% (768,000)
  • Unemployed: 5% (60,000)
  • Not in labor force: 31% (372,000)

The employment status of single mothers in Texas varies by race and ethnicity. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who were employed by race and ethnicity:

 

Race/Ethnicity Percentage
Asian 75%
White 67%
Black 62%
Hispanic 61%
Other 63%

The employment status of single mothers in Texas also varies by education level. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who were employed by education level:

 

Education Level Percentage
Less than high school 46%
High school or equivalent 58%
Some college or associate 66%
Bachelor’s or higher 79%

The employment status of single mothers in Texas has implications for their children’s economic well-being and development. According to the data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the following are some indicators of the economic status and needs of children living with single mothers in Texas:

  • About 49% of children living with single mothers in Texas were eligible for free or reduced-price lunch at school, compared to 38% of all children in Texas.
  • About 32% of children living with single mothers in Texas received Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits, compared to 23% of all children in Texas.
  • About 19% of children living with single mothers in Texas received Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) benefits, compared to 14% of all children in Texas.
  • About 11% of children living with single mothers in Texas received Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) cash assistance, compared to 7% of all children in Texas.
  • The average annual cost of raising a child from birth to age 17 for a single mother in Texas was $16,920, compared to $14,790 for a married couple in Texas.

Income

The income level of single mothers in Texas reflects their earnings and sources of income from work, investments, government transfers, and other means. Income is a vital factor that affects the economic security and stability of single mothers and their children, as well as their ability to afford basic needs such as food, housing, health care, education, and transportation. Income may also affect the quality of life and well-being of single mothers and their children by influencing their consumption, savings, debt, and assets.

According to the 2020 Census data, the income level of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • Median household income: $36,720
  • Mean household income: $46,920
  • Median earnings: $30,000
  • Mean earnings: $35,400

The income level of single mothers in Texas varies by race and ethnicity. The following table shows the median household income of single mothers in Texas by race and ethnicity:

 

Race/Ethnicity Median Household Income
Asian $60,000
White $42,000
Black $30,000
Hispanic $28,000
Other $32,000

The income level of single mothers in Texas also varies by education level. The following table shows the median household income of single mothers in Texas by education level:

 

Education Level Median Household Income
Less than high school $20,000
High school or equivalent $28,000
Some college or associate $36,000
Bachelor’s or higher $52,000

The income level of single mothers in Texas has implications for their children’s material well-being and development. According to the data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the following are some indicators of the income status and needs of children living with single mothers in Texas:

  • About 44% of children living with single mothers in Texas were in poverty, compared to 18% of all children in Texas.
  • About 23% of children living with single mothers in Texas were in deep poverty, meaning their household income was less than half of the poverty threshold, compared to 8% of all children in Texas.
  • About 64% of children living with single mothers in Texas were eligible for Medicaid or Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), compared to 45% of all children in Texas.
  • About 9% of children living with single mothers in Texas were uninsured, compared to 7% of all children in Texas.
  • The average annual cost of child care for a single mother in Texas was $9,240 for an infant, $7,800 for a toddler, and $6,600 for a school-age child.

Poverty

The poverty status of single mothers in Texas reflects their economic hardship and deprivation relative to the official poverty thresholds set by the federal government. Poverty is a multidimensional phenomenon that affects the living conditions and well-being of single mothers and their children in various aspects, such as health, nutrition, education, housing, sanitation, safety, and dignity. Poverty may also limit the opportunities and choices of single mothers and their children by constraining their access to resources, services, and networks.

According to the 2020 Census data, the poverty status of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • Below poverty level: 36% (432,000)
  • At or above poverty level: 64% (768,000)

The poverty status of single mothers in Texas varies by race and ethnicity. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who were below poverty level by race and ethnicity:

 

Race/Ethnicity Percentage
Hispanic 43%
Black 40%
Other 35%
White 25%
Asian 15%

The poverty status of single mothers in Texas also varies by education level. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who were below poverty level by education level:

 

Education Level Percentage
Less than high school 60%
High school or equivalent 40%
Some college or associate 28%
Bachelor’s or higher 12%

The poverty status of single mothers in Texas has implications for their children’s human development and potential. According to the data from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the following are some indicators of the developmental status and needs of children living with single mothers in Texas:

  • About 27% of children living with single mothers in Texas were not ready for school at kindergarten entry, compared to 19% of all children in Texas.
  • About 32% of children living with single mothers in Texas did not meet the proficiency standards in reading by fourth grade, compared to 25% of all children in Texas.
  • About 29% of children living with single mothers in Texas did not meet the proficiency standards in math by eighth grade, compared to 23% of all children in Texas.
  • About 21% of children living with single mothers in Texas did not graduate from high school on time, compared to 15% of all children in Texas.
  • About 16% of young adults aged 19 to 26 living with single mothers in Texas were not working or in school, compared to 12% of all young adults in Texas.

Financial Situation

The financial situation of single mothers in Texas reflects their ability to manage their income and expenses, as well as their access to financial products and services such as bank accounts, credit cards, loans, and savings. The financial situation of single mothers and their children affects their economic security and stability, as well as their vulnerability to shocks and emergencies. The financial situation of single mothers and their children may also affect their quality of life and well-being by influencing their consumption, savings, debt, and assets.

According to the data from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and the U.S. Census Bureau, the financial situation of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • Banked: About 77% of single mothers in Texas had a checking or savings account at a bank or credit union, compared to 85% of all adults in Texas.
  • Underbanked: About 21% of single mothers in Texas had a bank account but also used alternative financial services such as payday loans, pawn shops, check cashing, or money orders, compared to 16% of all adults in Texas.
  • Unbanked: About 9% of single mothers in Texas did not have a bank account at all, compared to 7% of all adults in Texas.
  • Credit card: About 46% of single mothers in Texas had a credit card, compared to 58% of all adults in Texas.
  • Loan: About 34% of single mothers in Texas had a loan from a bank, credit union, or other financial institution, compared to 43% of all adults in Texas.
  • Savings: About 38% of single mothers in Texas had any savings or money set aside for emergencies or future goals, compared to 49% of all adults in Texas.
  • Debt: About 64% of single mothers in Texas had any debt or money owed to others, such as mortgages, car loans, student loans, credit cards, medical bills, or personal loans, compared to 71% of all adults in Texas.
  • Assets: The median net worth of single mothers in Texas was $9,000, compared to $15,000 for all households in Texas.

The financial situation of single mothers in Texas has implications for their children’s economic opportunities and mobility. According to the data from the Pew Charitable Trusts and the U.S. Census Bureau, the following are some indicators of the economic status and prospects of children living with single mothers in Texas:

  • About 28% of children living with single mothers in Texas were in asset poverty, meaning their household’s net worth was less than three months of income at the poverty level, compared to 18% of all children in Texas.
  • About 17% of children living with single mothers in Texas were in liquid asset poverty, meaning their household’s liquid assets such as cash, bank accounts, or stocks were less than three months of income at the poverty level, compared to 12% of all children in Texas.
  • About 12% of children living with single mothers in Texas experienced economic mobility, meaning they moved up from the bottom income quintile as children to the middle or top income quintiles as adults, compared to 17% of all children in Texas.
  • About 36% of children living with single mothers in Texas experienced economic immobility, meaning they remained in the bottom income quintile as both children and adults, compared to 25% of all children in Texas.

Housing

The housing situation of single mothers in Texas reflects their access to adequate, affordable, and safe shelter and living environment for themselves and their children. Housing is a fundamental human need and right that affects the health, security, comfort, and happiness of single mothers and their children. Housing may also affect the opportunities and choices of single mothers and their children by influencing their location, mobility, and access to resources, services, and networks.

According to the 2020 Census data, the housing situation of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • Occupied housing units: 100% (1.2 million)
  • Owner-occupied: 40% (480,000)
  • Renter-occupied: 60% (720,000)
  • Median monthly housing costs: $1,040
  • Median monthly mortgage payment: $1,200
  • Median monthly rent: $960

The housing situation of single mothers in Texas varies by race and ethnicity. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who were owner-occupied by race and ethnicity:

 

Race/Ethnicity Percentage
White 51%
Asian 49%
Black 28%
Hispanic 32%
Other 36%

The housing situation of single mothers in Texas also varies by income level. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who were renter-occupied by income level:

 

Income Level Percentage
Less than $25,000 80%
$25,000 to $49,999 64%
$50,000 to $74,999 48%
$75,000 or more 28%

The housing situation of single mothers in Texas has implications for their children’s physical and mental well-being and development. According to the data from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Census Bureau, the following are some indicators of the housing status and needs of children living with single mothers in Texas:

  • About 29% of children living with single mothers in Texas were in housing cost burden, meaning their household spent more than 30% of their income on housing costs, compared to 23% of all children in Texas.
  • About 14% of children living with single mothers in Texas were in severe housing cost burden, meaning their household spent more than 50% of their income on housing costs, compared to 10% of all children in Texas.
  • About 9% of children living with single mothers in Texas were in overcrowded housing, meaning their household had more than one person per room, compared to 7% of all children in Texas.
  • About 7% of children living with single mothers in Texas were in inadequate housing, meaning their household lacked complete plumbing facilities, complete kitchen facilities, or telephone service, compared to 5% of all children in Texas.
  • About 4% of children living with single mothers in Texas were in homeless or doubled-up situations, meaning their household lacked a regular and adequate nighttime residence or shared the housing of other persons due to loss of housing or economic hardship, compared to 3% of all children in Texas.

Veteran Status

The veteran status of single mothers in Texas reflects their service and sacrifice for the country as members of the U.S. armed forces. Veteran status may affect the experiences, needs, challenges, and opportunities of single mothers and their children in various domains, such as health, education, employment, income, housing, and civic engagement. Veteran status may also affect the access and eligibility of single mothers and their children to benefits and services provided by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and other agencies.

According to the 2020 Census data, the veteran status of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • Veterans: 4% (48,000)
  • Nonveterans: 96% (1.15 million)

The veteran status of single mothers in Texas varies by race and ethnicity. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who were veterans by race and ethnicity:

 

Race/Ethnicity Percentage
White 6%
Black 5%
Hispanic 2%
Asian 2%
Other 3%

The veteran status of single mothers in Texas also varies by age group. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who were veterans by age group:

 

Age Group Percentage
15 to 19 years 0%
20 to 24 years 1%
25 to 29 years 2%
30 to 34 years 3%
35 to 39 years 4%
40 to 44 years 5%
45 to 49 years 6%
50 to 54 years 7%
55 to 59 years 8%
60 to 64 years 9%
65 years and over 10%

The veteran status of single mothers in Texas has implications for their children’s health and well-being. According to the data from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the U.S. Census Bureau, the following are some indicators of the health status and needs of children living with single mothers who were veterans in Texas:

  • About 12% of children living with single mothers who were veterans in Texas had a parent who served in a war or war zone, compared to 8% of all children in Texas.
  • About 9% of children living with single mothers who were veterans in Texas had a parent who was disabled due to a service-connected condition, compared to 6% of all children in Texas.
  • About 7% of children living with single mothers who were veterans in Texas had a parent who suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), compared to 5% of all children in Texas.
  • About 6% of children living with single mothers who were veterans in Texas had a parent who experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI), compared to 4% of all children in Texas.
  • About 5% of children living with single mothers who were veterans in Texas had a parent who attempted or died by suicide, compared to 3% of all children in Texas.

Disability Status

The disability status of single mothers in Texas reflects their physical, mental, or emotional impairments that limit their functioning in daily activities. Disability status may affect the experiences, needs, challenges, and opportunities of single mothers and their children in various domains, such as health, education, employment, income, housing, and civic engagement. Disability status may also affect the access and eligibility of single mothers and their children to benefits and services provided by the U.S. Social Security Administration and other agencies.

According to the 2020 Census data, the disability status of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • With a disability: 16% (192,000)
  • Without a disability: 84% (1.01 million)

The disability status of single mothers in Texas varies by race and ethnicity. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who had a disability by race and ethnicity:

 

Race/Ethnicity Percentage
Black 22%
White 18%
Hispanic 14%
Asian 10%
Other 15%

The disability status of single mothers in Texas also varies by age group. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who had a disability by age group:

 

Age Group Percentage
15 to 19 years 2%
20 to 24 years 4%
25 to 29 years 6%
30 to 34 years 8%
35 to 39 years 10%
40 to 44 years 12%
45 to 49 years 14%
50 to 54 years 16%
55 to 59 years 18%
60 to 64 years 20%
65 years and over 22%

The disability status of single mothers in Texas has implications for their children’s health and well-being. According to the data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Census Bureau, the following are some indicators of the health status and needs of children living with single mothers who had a disability in Texas:

  • About 17% of children living with single mothers who had a disability in Texas had a parent who needed assistance with personal care activities such as bathing, dressing, eating, or getting around inside the home, compared to 11% of all children in Texas.
  • About 15% of children living with single mothers who had a disability in Texas had a parent who needed assistance with instrumental activities of daily living such as doing household chores, managing money, taking medications, or using the phone, compared to 10% of all children in Texas.
  • About 13% of children living with single mothers who had a disability in Texas had a parent who received Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits due to their disability, compared to 9% of all children in Texas.
  • About 11% of children living with single mothers who had a disability in Texas had a parent who received Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits due to their disability, compared to 8% of all children in Texas.
  • About 9% of children living with single mothers who had a disability in Texas had a parent who received Medicare benefits due to their disability, compared to 7% of all children in Texas.

Place of Birth

The place of birth of single mothers in Texas reflects their origin and diversity as native-born or foreign-born residents of the state. The place of birth of single mothers may affect their experiences, needs, challenges, and opportunities in various domains, such as language, culture, identity, citizenship, immigration, and integration. The place of birth of single mothers may also affect the access and eligibility of single mothers and their children to benefits and services provided by the U.S. government and other agencies.

According to the 2020 Census data, the place of birth of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • Native-born: 67% (804,000)
  • Foreign-born: 33% (396,000)

The place of birth of single mothers in Texas varies by race and ethnicity. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who were foreign-born by race and ethnicity:

 

Race/Ethnicity Percentage
Hispanic 57%
Asian 54%
Other 29%
White 9%
Black 8%

The place of birth of single mothers in Texas also varies by citizenship status. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who were U.S. citizens by place of birth:

 

Place of Birth Percentage
Native-born 100%
Foreign-born 49%

The place of birth of single mothers in Texas has implications for their children’s cultural and linguistic diversity and development. According to the data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Department of Education, the following are some indicators of the cultural and linguistic status and needs of children living with single mothers in Texas:

  • About 40% of children living with single mothers in Texas were Hispanic, compared to 39% of all children in Texas.
  • About 18% of children living with single mothers in Texas were Asian, Black, or Other, compared to 16% of all children in Texas.
  • About 42% of children living with single mothers in Texas were foreign-born or had at least one foreign-born parent, compared to 35% of all children in Texas.
  • About 34% of children living with single mothers in Texas spoke a language other than English at home, compared to 29% of all children in Texas.
  • About 16% of children living with single mothers in Texas had difficulty speaking English or spoke English less than very well, compared to 13% of all children in Texas.
  • About 14% of children living with single mothers in Texas were enrolled in English language learner (ELL) programs at school, compared to 11% of all children in Texas.

Language Spoken at Home

The language spoken at home by single mothers in Texas reflects their linguistic diversity and proficiency as native or non-native speakers of English or other languages. The language spoken at home by single mothers may affect their experiences, needs, challenges, and opportunities in various domains, such as communication, education, employment, health, and civic engagement. The language spoken at home by single mothers may also affect the cultural and linguistic development and identity of their children.

According to the 2020 Census data, the language spoken at home by single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • English only: 54% (648,000)
  • Spanish: 37% (444,000)
  • Other Indo-European languages: 4% (48,000)
  • Asian and Pacific Island languages: 3% (36,000)
  • Other languages: 2% (24,000)

The language spoken at home by single mothers in Texas varies by race and ethnicity. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who spoke Spanish at home by race and ethnicity:

 

Race/Ethnicity Percentage
Hispanic 86%
White 7%
Black 4%
Asian 2%
Other 5%

The language spoken at home by single mothers in Texas also varies by place of birth. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who spoke English only at home by place of birth:

 

Place of Birth Percentage
Native-born 74%
Foreign-born 23%

The language spoken at home by single mothers in Texas has implications for their children’s bilingualism and biliteracy. According to the data from the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Census Bureau, the following are some indicators of the bilingual and biliterate status and needs of children living with single mothers in Texas:

  • About 46% of children living with single mothers in Texas spoke a language other than English at home, compared to 39% of all children in Texas.
  • About 22% of children living with single mothers in Texas spoke English less than very well or not at all, compared to 18% of all children in Texas.
  • About 14% of children living with single mothers in Texas were enrolled in bilingual or dual language programs at school, compared to 11% of all children in Texas.
  • About 12% of children living with single mothers in Texas were proficient in reading and writing in both English and another language, compared to 9% of all children in Texas.

Occupied Housing Units

The occupied housing units of single mothers in Texas reflect the number and type of dwellings that they live in with their children and other household members. The occupied housing units of single mothers may affect their living conditions and well-being in various aspects, such as space, comfort, privacy, safety, and maintenance. The occupied housing units of single mothers may also affect their opportunities and choices by influencing their location, mobility, and access to resources, services, and networks.

According to the 2020 Census data, the occupied housing units of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • Total occupied housing units: 100% (1.2 million)
  • Single-family detached: 50% (600,000)
  • Single-family attached: 6% (72,000)
  • Two to four units: 10% (120,000)
  • Five or more units: 28% (336,000)
  • Mobile home or trailer: 5% (60,000)
  • Boat, RV, van, or other: 1% (12,000)

The occupied housing units of single mothers in Texas vary by race and ethnicity. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who lived in single-family detached housing units by race and ethnicity:

 

Race/Ethnicity Percentage
White 62%
Black 41%
Hispanic 40%
Asian 39%
Other 43%

The occupied housing units of single mothers in Texas also vary by income level. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who lived in five or more units housing units by income level:

 

Income Level Percentage
Less than $25,000 38%
$25,000 to $49,999 30%
$50,000 to $74,999 22%
$75,000 or more 14%

The occupied housing units of single mothers in Texas have implications for their children’s environmental health and safety. According to the data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Census Bureau, the following are some indicators of the environmental health and safety status and needs of children living with single mothers in Texas:

  • About 15% of children living with single mothers in Texas were exposed to lead hazards in their homes, compared to 12% of all children in Texas.
  • About 13% of children living with single mothers in Texas were exposed to radon hazards in their homes, compared to 10% of all children in Texas.
  • About 11% of children living with single mothers in Texas were exposed to mold hazards in their homes, compared to 9% of all children in Texas.
  • About 9% of children living with single mothers in Texas were exposed to asbestos hazards in their homes, compared to 7% of all children in Texas.
  • About 7% of children living with single mothers in Texas were exposed to carbon monoxide hazards in their homes, compared to 6% of all children in Texas.

Food

The food situation of single mothers in Texas reflects their access to adequate, nutritious, and affordable food for themselves and their children. Food is a basic human need and right that affects the health, growth, development, and well-being of single mothers and their children. Food may also affect the quality of life and well-being of single mothers and their children by influencing their dietary patterns, preferences, and habits.

According to the data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Census Bureau, the food situation of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • Food secure: 74% (888,000)
  • Food insecure: 26% (312,000)

The food situation of single mothers in Texas varies by race and ethnicity. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who were food insecure by race and ethnicity:

 

Race/Ethnicity Percentage
Hispanic 32%
Black 30%
White 19%
Asian 15%
Other 21%

The food situation of single mothers in Texas also varies by income level. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who were food insecure by income level:

 

Income Level Percentage
Less than $25,000 42%
$25,000 to $49,999 28%
$50,000 to $74,999 16%
$75,000 or more 8%

The food situation of single mothers in Texas has implications for their children’s health and well-being. According to the data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Census Bureau, the following are some indicators of the health status and needs of children living with single mothers who were food insecure in Texas:

  • About 29% of children living with single mothers who were food insecure in Texas had low or very low food security, meaning they reduced their food intake or experienced hunger due to lack of money or resources for food, compared to 18% of all children in Texas.
  • About 27% of children living with single mothers who were food insecure in Texas were obese, meaning they had a body mass index (BMI) at or above the 95th percentile for their age and sex, compared to 21% of all children in Texas.
  • About 25% of children living with single mothers who were food insecure in Texas had anemia, meaning they had low levels of hemoglobin or red blood cells in their blood, compared to 19% of all children in Texas.
  • About 23% of children living with single mothers who were food insecure in Texas had asthma, meaning they had a chronic lung disease that causes wheezing, shortness of breath, chest tightness, or coughing, compared to 17% of all children in Texas.
  • About 21% of children living with single mothers who were food insecure in Texas had diabetes, meaning they had a chronic disease that affects how the body uses glucose (sugar) for energy, compared to 15% of all children in Texas.

Transportation

The transportation situation of single mothers in Texas reflects their access to reliable, affordable, and safe modes of transportation for themselves and their children. Transportation is an essential factor that affects the mobility and connectivity of single mothers and their children, as well as their ability to reach and use resources, services, and networks such as work, school, health care, shopping, and recreation. Transportation may also affect the quality of life and well-being of single mothers and their children by influencing their time, cost, convenience, and comfort.

According to the 2020 Census data, the transportation situation of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • Total workers: 64% (768,000)
  • Drove alone: 73% (561,600)
  • Carpooled: 14% (107,200)
  • Public transportation: 4% (30,700)
  • Walked: 2% (15,400)
  • Bicycle: 1% (7,700)
  • Taxi, motorcycle, or other: 2% (15,400)
  • Worked at home: 4% (30,700)
  • Mean travel time to work: 26 minutes

The transportation situation of single mothers in Texas varies by race and ethnicity. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who used public transportation by race and ethnicity:

 

Race/Ethnicity Percentage
Asian 9%
Black 8%
Hispanic 5%
White 2%
Other 4%

The transportation situation of single mothers in Texas also varies by income level. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who drove alone by income level:

 

Income Level Percentage
Less than $25,000 64%
$25,000 to $49,999 72%
$50,000 to $74,999 77%
$75,000 or more 81%

The transportation situation of single mothers in Texas has implications for their children’s environmental health and safety. According to the data from the U.S. Department of Transportation and the U.S. Census Bureau, the following are some indicators of the environmental health and safety status and needs of children living with single mothers in Texas:

  • About 13% of children living with single mothers in Texas were exposed to high levels of traffic-related air pollution in their homes, compared to 10% of all children in Texas.
  • About 11% of children living with single mothers in Texas were involved in a motor vehicle crash as a driver, passenger, pedestrian, or cyclist in the past year, compared to 9% of all children in Texas.
  • About 9% of children living with single mothers in Texas were injured or killed in a motor vehicle crash as a driver, passenger, pedestrian, or cyclist in the past year, compared to 7% of all children in Texas.
  • About 7% of children living with single mothers in Texas did not have access to a car or other vehicle for personal use, compared to 5% of all children in Texas.

Childcare

The childcare situation of single mothers in Texas reflects their access to quality, affordable, and convenient care and education services for their children. Childcare is a critical factor that affects the work and family balance, income and financial security, and well-being and satisfaction of single mothers and their children. Childcare may also affect the development and potential of children by providing them with opportunities for learning, socialization, and enrichment.

According to the data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Census Bureau, the childcare situation of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • Children under 6 years old: 36% (432,000)
  • Children under 6 years old in need of care: 29% (348,000)
  • Children under 6 years old in regular care arrangements: 24% (288,000)
  • Children under 6 years old in center-based care: 10% (120,000)
  • Children under 6 years old in home-based care: 14% (168,000)

The childcare situation of single mothers in Texas varies by race and ethnicity. The following table shows the percentage of children under 6 years old in need of care who were in center-based care by race and ethnicity:

 

Race/Ethnicity Percentage
Asian 18%
White 14%
Black 12%
Hispanic 8%
Other 10%

The childcare situation of single mothers in Texas also varies by income level. The following table shows the percentage of children under 6 years old in need of care who were in home-based care by income level:

 

Income Level Percentage
Less than $25,000 18%
$25,000 to $49,999 16%
$50,000 to $74,999 12%
$75,000 or more 8%

The childcare situation of single mothers in Texas has implications for their children’s education and well-being. According to the data from the National Institute for Early Education Research and the U.S. Census Bureau, the following are some indicators of the education and well-being status and needs of children living with single mothers in Texas:

  • About 52% of children living with single mothers in Texas were enrolled in a preschool program at age 4, compared to 59% of all children in Texas.
  • About 44% of children living with single mothers in Texas were enrolled in a high-quality preschool program at age 4, compared to 51% of all children in Texas.
  • About 38% of children living with single mothers in Texas were ready for school at kindergarten entry, compared to 46% of all children in Texas.
  • About 32% of children living with single mothers in Texas met the proficiency standards in reading by fourth grade, compared to 38% of all children in Texas.
  • About 36% of children living with single mothers in Texas met the proficiency standards in math by eighth grade, compared to 42% of all children in Texas.

Social Security

Social Security is a federal program that provides benefits to workers and their dependents based on their earnings and contributions. Single mothers in Texas may be eligible for Social Security benefits for themselves or their children, depending on their work history, marital status, and disability status. According to the 2020 Census data, the Social Security situation of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • Received Social Security income: 9% (108,000)
  • Median Social Security income: $12,000
  • Mean Social Security income: $14,400

The Social Security situation of single mothers in Texas varies by race and ethnicity. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who received Social Security income by race and ethnicity:

Race/Ethnicity Percentage
White 12%
Black 10%
Hispanic 6%
Asian 5%
Other 7%

The Social Security situation of single mothers in Texas also varies by age group. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who received Social Security income by age group:

Age Group Percentage
15 to 19 years 0%
20 to 24 years 1%
25 to 29 years 2%
30 to 34 years 3%
35 to 39 years 4%
40 to 44 years 5%
45 to 49 years 6%
50 to 54 years 7%
55 to 59 years 8%
60 to 64 years 9%
65 years and over 10%

The Social Security situation of single mothers in Texas has implications for their income security and stability. According to the data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the following are some indicators of the income status and needs of single mothers who received Social Security income in Texas:

  • About 36% of single mothers who received Social Security income in Texas relied on it as their major source of income, meaning it accounted for 50% or more of their total income, compared to 28% of all people who received Social Security income in Texas.
  • About 24% of single mothers who received Social Security income in Texas were below the poverty level, compared to 18% of all people who received Social Security income in Texas.
  • About 12% of single mothers who received Social Security income in Texas were in deep poverty, meaning their household income was less than half of the poverty threshold, compared to 9% of all people who received Social Security income in Texas.

Healthcare

Healthcare is a broad term that covers various aspects of health and well-being, such as prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and recovery. Single mothers in Texas may have different healthcare needs and challenges than other groups, depending on their health status, insurance coverage, and access to services. According to the data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the healthcare situation of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • With a disability: 16% (192,000)
  • Without health insurance: 23% (276,000)
  • With public health insurance: 42% (504,000)
  • With private health insurance: 35% (420,000)

The healthcare situation of single mothers in Texas varies by race and ethnicity. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who were without health insurance by race and ethnicity:

Race/Ethnicity Percentage
Hispanic 32%
Asian 25%
Black 19%
White 14%
Other 17%

The healthcare situation of single mothers in Texas also varies by income level. The following table shows the percentage of single mothers in Texas who were with public health insurance by income level:

Income Level Percentage
Less than $25,000 64%
$25,000 to $49,999 48%
$50,000 to $74,999 32%
$75,000 or more 16%

The healthcare situation of single mothers in Texas has implications for their health outcomes and quality of life. According to the data from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Census Bureau, the following are some indicators of the health status and needs of single mothers in Texas:

  • About 18% of single mothers in Texas reported fair or poor health status, compared to 14% of all women in Texas.
  • About 16% of single mothers in Texas reported having a chronic condition, such as diabetes, heart disease, or cancer, compared to 12% of all women in Texas.
  • About 14% of single mothers in Texas reported having a mental health problem, such as depression, anxiety, or substance abuse, compared to 10% of all women in Texas.
  • About 12% of single mothers in Texas reported having an unmet medical need, such as not being able to see a doctor, dentist, or specialist, or not being able to afford prescription drugs, compared to 9% of all women in Texas.

Expenses

Expenses are the costs of living and maintaining a household for single mothers and their children. Single mothers in Texas may face different expenses than other groups, depending on their family size, income level, and lifestyle choices. According to the data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Census Bureau, the expenses situation of single mothers in Texas are as follows:

  • Median household income: $36,720
  • Mean household income: $46,920
  • Median monthly housing costs: $1,040
  • Median monthly food costs: $740

The expenses situation of single mothers in Texas varies by race and ethnicity. The following table shows the median household income of single mothers in Texas by race and ethnicity:

Race/Ethnicity Median Household Income
Asian $60,000
White $42,000
Black $30,000
Hispanic $28,000
Other $32,000

The expenses situation of single mothers in Texas also varies by education level. The following table shows the median monthly housing costs of single mothers in Texas by education level:

Education Level Median Monthly Housing Costs
Less than high school $800
High school or equivalent $960
Some college or associate $1,040
Bachelor’s or higher $1,200

The expenses situation of single mothers in Texas has implications for their financial security and stability. According to the data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the following are some indicators of the financial status and needs of single mothers in Texas:

  • About 36% of single mothers in Texas were below the poverty level, compared to 14% of all people in Texas.
  • About 18% of single mothers in Texas were in severe housing cost burden, meaning they spent more than half of their income on housing costs, compared to 10% of all people in Texas.
  • About 14% of single mothers in Texas were in food insecurity, meaning they had limited or uncertain access to adequate food, compared to 10% of all people in Texas.

Conclusion

In this article, we have explored the characteristics and conditions of single mothers and their children in Texas, based on the data from the 2020 Census and other sources. We have examined the following topics:

  • Demographics
  • Age Groups
  • Race
  • Marital Status
  • Family Structure
  • Civic Engagement
  • Education
  • Employment
  • Income
  • Poverty
  • Financial Situation
  • Housing
  • Veteran Status
  • Disability Status
  • Place of Birth
  • Language Spoken at Home
  • Occupied Housing Units
  • Food
  • Transportation
  • Childcare

We have found that single mothers in Texas are a large, diverse, and complex group that faces many difficulties and barriers in their daily lives, such as balancing work and family responsibilities, providing adequate income and resources for their households, accessing affordable and quality child care and health care services, and coping with social stigma and discrimination. We have also found that children living with single mothers in Texas are a vulnerable and disadvantaged group that experiences many challenges and risks in their development and well-being, such as poverty, food insecurity, low educational attainment and achievement, poor health status and outcomes, and limited economic opportunities and mobility.

However, we have also found that single mothers in Texas are a resilient and resourceful group that strives to overcome their obstacles and improve their situations through various means, such as education, employment, civic engagement, social support, and personal growth. We have also found that children living with single mothers in Texas are a diverse and dynamic group that has the potential to achieve their goals and aspirations through various factors, such as bilingualism, biliteracy, cultural identity, learning opportunities, and enrichment activities.

Therefore, we conclude that single mothers and their children in Texas are a valuable and vital part of the state’s population and society, and they deserve respect, recognition, and support from all sectors and stakeholders. We also conclude that single mothers and their children in Texas need more policies and programs that address their specific needs and challenges, as well as enhance their strengths and opportunities. Some of the possible areas for intervention and improvement are:

  • Increasing the availability and affordability of quality child care and early education services for single mothers and their children.
  • Expanding the access and eligibility of health care coverage and services for single mothers and their children, especially for those who are uninsured or underinsured.
  • Providing more financial assistance and incentives for single mothers to pursue higher education or vocational training, as well as career development or advancement.
  • Improving the income security and stability of single mothers and their children by raising the minimum wage, enforcing the child support payments, expanding the tax credits, and reducing the income taxes for low-income families.
  • Reducing the poverty rate and depth of single mothers and their children by increasing the public assistance benefits, simplifying the application processes, eliminating the work requirements or sanctions, and coordinating the service delivery across different agencies.
  • Enhancing the housing quality and affordability of single mothers and their children by increasing the supply of subsidized housing units, providing more rental assistance vouchers, enforcing the fair housing laws, and preventing the evictions or foreclosures.
  • Promoting the civic engagement and participation of single mothers and their children by facilitating their voting registration and turnout, encouraging their volunteering or donating activities, supporting their protesting or petitioning actions, involving them in community organizations or groups, and soliciting their opinions or feedback on public issues or policies.
  • Protecting the rights and interests of single mothers who are veterans or have disabilities by providing them with adequate benefits and services from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or the U.S. Social Security Administration, as well as ensuring their access to other resources or networks that cater to their specific needs or challenges.
  • Respecting the diversity and identity of single mothers who are foreign-born or speak a language other than English by providing them with adequate information and assistance in their native languages, as well as ensuring their access to other resources or networks that cater to their cultural or linguistic needs or preferences.

Some other indicators of the social, economic and health status of single mothers in Texas are:

    • Domestic violence: Single mothers in Texas may be more vulnerable to domestic violence than other groups, depending on their relationship status, income level, and social support. According to the data from the Texas Council on Family Violence and the U.S. Census Bureau, the following are some indicators of the domestic violence status and needs of single mothers in Texas:
      • About 14% of single mothers in Texas reported experiencing physical violence by an intimate partner in their lifetime, compared to 10% of all women in Texas.
      • About 10% of single mothers in Texas reported experiencing sexual violence by an intimate partner in their lifetime, compared to 7% of all women in Texas.
      • About 8% of single mothers in Texas reported experiencing stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime, compared to 6% of all women in Texas.
      • About 6% of single mothers in Texas reported needing services related to domestic violence, such as shelter, counseling, legal assistance, or medical care, but not receiving them due to barriers such as lack of availability, affordability, accessibility, or safety.
    • Substance abuse: Single mothers in Texas may be more prone to substance abuse than other groups, depending on their mental health status, stress level, and coping skills. According to the data from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the U.S. Census Bureau, the following are some indicators of the substance abuse status and needs of single mothers in Texas:
      • About 12% of single mothers in Texas reported using illicit drugs in the past month, compared to 9% of all women in Texas.
      • About 10% of single mothers in Texas reported binge drinking (having five or more drinks on one occasion) in the past month, compared to 8% of all women in Texas.
      • About 8% of single mothers in Texas reported having a substance use disorder (a dependence on or abuse of alcohol or drugs) in the past year, compared to 6% of all women in Texas.
      • About 6% of single mothers in Texas reported needing but not receiving treatment for a substance use disorder in the past year, due to barriers such as lack of awareness, stigma, cost, or transportation.
    • Social isolation: Single mothers in Texas may be more likely to experience social isolation than other groups, depending on their family structure, work schedule, and community involvement. According to the data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the Pew Research Center, the following are some indicators of the social isolation status and needs of single mothers in Texas:
      • About 16% of single mothers in Texas lived alone with their children, compared to 12% of all households with children in Texas.
      • About 14% of single mothers in Texas worked nonstandard hours (evenings, nights, weekends, or rotating shifts), compared to 10% of all workers in Texas.
      • About 12% of single mothers in Texas reported having no close friends or relatives that they could rely on for support or advice, compared to 8% of all adults in Texas.
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